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ALG1-CDG: Clinical and Molecular Characterization of 39 Unreported Patients.

Ng, Bobby G; Shiryaev, Sergey A; Rymen, Daisy; Eklund, Erik LU ; Raymond, Kimiyo; Kircher, Martin; Abdenur, Jose E; Alehan, Fusun; Midro, Alina T and Bamshad, Michael J, et al. (2016) In Human Mutation
Abstract
Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) arise from pathogenic mutations in over one hundred genes leading to impaired protein or lipid glycosylation. ALG1 encodes a β1,4 mannosyltransferase that catalyzes the addition of the first of nine mannose moieties to form a dolichol-lipid linked oligosaccharide intermediate (DLO) required for proper N-linked glycosylation. ALG1 mutations cause a rare autosomal recessive disorder termed ALG1-CDG. To date thirteen mutations in eighteen patients from fourteen families have been described with varying degrees of clinical severity. We identified and characterized thirty-nine previously unreported cases of ALG1-CDG from thirty-two families and add twenty-six new mutations. Pathogenicity of each... (More)
Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) arise from pathogenic mutations in over one hundred genes leading to impaired protein or lipid glycosylation. ALG1 encodes a β1,4 mannosyltransferase that catalyzes the addition of the first of nine mannose moieties to form a dolichol-lipid linked oligosaccharide intermediate (DLO) required for proper N-linked glycosylation. ALG1 mutations cause a rare autosomal recessive disorder termed ALG1-CDG. To date thirteen mutations in eighteen patients from fourteen families have been described with varying degrees of clinical severity. We identified and characterized thirty-nine previously unreported cases of ALG1-CDG from thirty-two families and add twenty-six new mutations. Pathogenicity of each mutation was confirmed based on its inability to rescue impaired growth or hypoglycosylation of a standard biomarker in an alg1-deficient yeast strain. Using this approach we could not establish a rank order comparison of biomarker glycosylation and patient phenotype, but we identified mutations with a lethal outcome in the first two years of life. The recently identified protein-linked xeno-tetrasaccharide biomarker, NeuAc-Gal-GlcNAc2 , was seen in all twenty-seven patients tested. Our study triples the number of known patients and expands the molecular and clinical correlates of this disorder. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. (Less)
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Human Mutation
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:26931382
  • wos:000379934200004
  • scopus:84974730910
ISSN
1059-7794
DOI
10.1002/humu.22983
language
English
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yes
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8cd3648c-a8af-468e-b1a7-1c54640d8986 (old id 8856616)
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26931382?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-03-15 11:05:59
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2017-06-11 04:42:54
@article{8cd3648c-a8af-468e-b1a7-1c54640d8986,
  abstract     = {Congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) arise from pathogenic mutations in over one hundred genes leading to impaired protein or lipid glycosylation. ALG1 encodes a β1,4 mannosyltransferase that catalyzes the addition of the first of nine mannose moieties to form a dolichol-lipid linked oligosaccharide intermediate (DLO) required for proper N-linked glycosylation. ALG1 mutations cause a rare autosomal recessive disorder termed ALG1-CDG. To date thirteen mutations in eighteen patients from fourteen families have been described with varying degrees of clinical severity. We identified and characterized thirty-nine previously unreported cases of ALG1-CDG from thirty-two families and add twenty-six new mutations. Pathogenicity of each mutation was confirmed based on its inability to rescue impaired growth or hypoglycosylation of a standard biomarker in an alg1-deficient yeast strain. Using this approach we could not establish a rank order comparison of biomarker glycosylation and patient phenotype, but we identified mutations with a lethal outcome in the first two years of life. The recently identified protein-linked xeno-tetrasaccharide biomarker, NeuAc-Gal-GlcNAc2 , was seen in all twenty-seven patients tested. Our study triples the number of known patients and expands the molecular and clinical correlates of this disorder. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Ng, Bobby G and Shiryaev, Sergey A and Rymen, Daisy and Eklund, Erik and Raymond, Kimiyo and Kircher, Martin and Abdenur, Jose E and Alehan, Fusun and Midro, Alina T and Bamshad, Michael J and Barone, Rita and Berry, Gerard T and Brumbaugh, Jane E and Buckingham, Kati J and Clarkson, Katie and Cole, F Sessions and O'Connor, Shawn and Cooper, Gregory M and Van Coster, Rudy and Demmer, Laurie A and Diogo, Luisa and Fay, Alexander J and Ficicioglu, Can and Fiumara, Agata and Gahl, William A and Ganetzky, Rebecca and Goel, Himanshu and Harshman, Lyndsay A and He, Miao and Jaeken, Jaak and James, Philip M and Katz, Daniel and Keldermans, Liesbeth and Kibaek, Maria and Kornberg, Andrew J and Lachlan, Katherine and Lam, Christina and Yaplito-Lee, Joy and Nickerson, Deborah A and Peters, Heidi L and Race, Valerie and Régal, Luc and Rush, Jeffrey S and Rutledge, S Lane and Shendure, Jay and Souche, Erika and Sparks, Susan E and Trapane, Pamela and Sanchez-Valle, Amarilis and Vilain, Eric and Vøllo, Arve and Waechter, Charles J and Wang, Raymond Y and Wolfe, Lynne A and Wong, Derek A and Wood, Tim and Yang, Amy C and Matthijs, Gert and Freeze, Hudson H},
  issn         = {1059-7794},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Human Mutation},
  title        = {ALG1-CDG: Clinical and Molecular Characterization of 39 Unreported Patients.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.22983},
  year         = {2016},
}