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Upper respiratory tract infections in general practice: Diagnosis, antibiotic prescribing, duration of symptoms and use of diagnostic tests

Andre, M; Odenholt, Inga LU and Schwan, A (2002) In Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases 34(12). p.880-886
Abstract
A diagnosis/antibiotic prescribing study was performed in 5 counties in Sweden for 1 week in November 2000. As part of this study, the characteristics and clinical management of patients with upper respiratory tract infections ( n = 2899) in primary care were analyzed. Almost half of the patients were aged < 15 y and one-fifth of the patients consulted out of hours. Of all patients seeking primary care for upper respiratory tract infections, 56.0% were prescribed an antibiotic. Almost all patients who were given the diagnoses streptococcal tonsillitis, acute otitis media or acute sinusitis were prescribed antibiotics, compared to 10% of patients with common cold or acute pharyngitis. The most frequently prescribed antibiotic was... (More)
A diagnosis/antibiotic prescribing study was performed in 5 counties in Sweden for 1 week in November 2000. As part of this study, the characteristics and clinical management of patients with upper respiratory tract infections ( n = 2899) in primary care were analyzed. Almost half of the patients were aged < 15 y and one-fifth of the patients consulted out of hours. Of all patients seeking primary care for upper respiratory tract infections, 56.0% were prescribed an antibiotic. Almost all patients who were given the diagnoses streptococcal tonsillitis, acute otitis media or acute sinusitis were prescribed antibiotics, compared to 10% of patients with common cold or acute pharyngitis. The most frequently prescribed antibiotic was penicillin V (79.2%) and this was even more pronounced out of hours, when the diagnoses otitis media and streptococcal tonsillitis were more frequently used. In patients with common cold and acute pharyngitis, the percentage who received antibiotics increased with increasing length of symptoms and increasing CRP levels. In patients with acute pharyngitis or streptococcal tonsillitis, antibiotics were prescribed less frequently provided streptococcal tests were performed. The management of patients with upper respiratory tract infections in general practice seems to be in good agreement with current Swedish guidelines. However, the study indicates some areas for improvement. The diagnosis of acute sinusitis seems to have been overestimated and used only to justify antibiotic treatment. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases
volume
34
issue
12
pages
880 - 886
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • wos:000180223300002
  • scopus:0036992756
ISSN
1651-1980
DOI
10.1080/0036554021000026952
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d1ac9fe5-8aff-40db-a4d2-c7b74996d622 (old id 891451)
date added to LUP
2008-01-15 16:25:09
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:39:57
@article{d1ac9fe5-8aff-40db-a4d2-c7b74996d622,
  abstract     = {A diagnosis/antibiotic prescribing study was performed in 5 counties in Sweden for 1 week in November 2000. As part of this study, the characteristics and clinical management of patients with upper respiratory tract infections ( n = 2899) in primary care were analyzed. Almost half of the patients were aged &lt; 15 y and one-fifth of the patients consulted out of hours. Of all patients seeking primary care for upper respiratory tract infections, 56.0% were prescribed an antibiotic. Almost all patients who were given the diagnoses streptococcal tonsillitis, acute otitis media or acute sinusitis were prescribed antibiotics, compared to 10% of patients with common cold or acute pharyngitis. The most frequently prescribed antibiotic was penicillin V (79.2%) and this was even more pronounced out of hours, when the diagnoses otitis media and streptococcal tonsillitis were more frequently used. In patients with common cold and acute pharyngitis, the percentage who received antibiotics increased with increasing length of symptoms and increasing CRP levels. In patients with acute pharyngitis or streptococcal tonsillitis, antibiotics were prescribed less frequently provided streptococcal tests were performed. The management of patients with upper respiratory tract infections in general practice seems to be in good agreement with current Swedish guidelines. However, the study indicates some areas for improvement. The diagnosis of acute sinusitis seems to have been overestimated and used only to justify antibiotic treatment.},
  author       = {Andre, M and Odenholt, Inga and Schwan, A},
  issn         = {1651-1980},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {880--886},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases},
  title        = {Upper respiratory tract infections in general practice: Diagnosis, antibiotic prescribing, duration of symptoms and use of diagnostic tests},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0036554021000026952},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2002},
}