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Efficacy of bystander CPR: Intervention by lay people and by health care professionals

Herlitz, J; Svensson, L; Holmberg, S; Angquist, KA and Young, Marie LU (2005) In Resuscitation 66(3). p.291-295
Abstract
Background: Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by bystanders prior to the arrival of the rescue team has been shown to be associated with increased survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of this survey was to evaluate the impact on survival of no bystander CPR, lay bystander CPR and professional bystander CPR. Methods: Patients suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden between 1990 and 2002 who were given CPR and were not witnessed by the ambulance crew were included. Results: In all, 29,711 patients were included, 36% of whom received bystander CPR prior to the arrival of the rescue team. Among the latter, 72% received CPR from lay people and 28% from professionals. Survival to I month was 2.2% among... (More)
Background: Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by bystanders prior to the arrival of the rescue team has been shown to be associated with increased survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of this survey was to evaluate the impact on survival of no bystander CPR, lay bystander CPR and professional bystander CPR. Methods: Patients suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden between 1990 and 2002 who were given CPR and were not witnessed by the ambulance crew were included. Results: In all, 29,711 patients were included, 36% of whom received bystander CPR prior to the arrival of the rescue team. Among the latter, 72% received CPR from lay people and 28% from professionals. Survival to I month was 2.2% among those who received no bystander CPR, 4.9% among those who received bystander CPR from lay people (p<0.0001) and 9.2% among those who received bystander CPR from professionals (p < 0.0001 compared with bystander CPR by lay people). In a multivariate analysis, lay bystander CPR was associated with improved survival compared to no bystander CPR (OR: 2.04; 95% Cl: 1.72-2.42), and professional bystander CPR was associated with improved survival compared to lay bystander CPR (OR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1. 12-1.67). Conclusion: Among patients suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, bystander CPR by lay persons (excluding health care professionals) is associated with an increased chance of survival. Furthermore, there is a distinction between lay persons and health care providers; survival is higher when the latter perform bystander CPR. However, these results may not be explained by differences in the quality of CPR. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cardiac arrest, bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation
in
Resuscitation
volume
66
issue
3
pages
291 - 295
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:15950357
  • wos:000232269500007
  • scopus:24044455676
ISSN
1873-1570
DOI
10.1016/j.resuscitation.2005.04.003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e0ceb5ed-e0d5-42b0-bd6e-4cf0da29ed22 (old id 891496)
date added to LUP
2008-01-16 10:54:37
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:41:57
@article{e0ceb5ed-e0d5-42b0-bd6e-4cf0da29ed22,
  abstract     = {Background: Early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) by bystanders prior to the arrival of the rescue team has been shown to be associated with increased survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The aim of this survey was to evaluate the impact on survival of no bystander CPR, lay bystander CPR and professional bystander CPR. Methods: Patients suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden between 1990 and 2002 who were given CPR and were not witnessed by the ambulance crew were included. Results: In all, 29,711 patients were included, 36% of whom received bystander CPR prior to the arrival of the rescue team. Among the latter, 72% received CPR from lay people and 28% from professionals. Survival to I month was 2.2% among those who received no bystander CPR, 4.9% among those who received bystander CPR from lay people (p&lt;0.0001) and 9.2% among those who received bystander CPR from professionals (p &lt; 0.0001 compared with bystander CPR by lay people). In a multivariate analysis, lay bystander CPR was associated with improved survival compared to no bystander CPR (OR: 2.04; 95% Cl: 1.72-2.42), and professional bystander CPR was associated with improved survival compared to lay bystander CPR (OR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1. 12-1.67). Conclusion: Among patients suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, bystander CPR by lay persons (excluding health care professionals) is associated with an increased chance of survival. Furthermore, there is a distinction between lay persons and health care providers; survival is higher when the latter perform bystander CPR. However, these results may not be explained by differences in the quality of CPR.},
  author       = {Herlitz, J and Svensson, L and Holmberg, S and Angquist, KA and Young, Marie},
  issn         = {1873-1570},
  keyword      = {cardiac arrest,bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {291--295},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Resuscitation},
  title        = {Efficacy of bystander CPR: Intervention by lay people and by health care professionals},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2005.04.003},
  volume       = {66},
  year         = {2005},
}