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A Swedish case-control network for studies of drug-induced morbidity - acute pancreatitis

Blomgren, KB; Sundstrom, A; Steineck, G; Genell, S; Sjostedt, S and Wiholm, BE (2002) In European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology 58(4). p.275-283
Abstract
Objective: To evaluate risk factors - notably drugs - for developing acute pancreatitis. Methods: A population-based, case-control study, encompassing 1.4 million inhabitants aged 20-85 years from four regions in Sweden between 1 January 1995 and 31 May 1998. A total of 462 cases were hospitalised in surgical departments with their first episode of acute pancreatitis without previously known biliary stone disease. From a population register, 1781 controls were randomly selected. Information was obtained from medical records and through telephone interviews. Results: Fifty-seven percent of the cases were males. An expert group found evidence for biliary stones in 50% of the cases, alcohol intake in 23%, but in 29% neither of these factors... (More)
Objective: To evaluate risk factors - notably drugs - for developing acute pancreatitis. Methods: A population-based, case-control study, encompassing 1.4 million inhabitants aged 20-85 years from four regions in Sweden between 1 January 1995 and 31 May 1998. A total of 462 cases were hospitalised in surgical departments with their first episode of acute pancreatitis without previously known biliary stone disease. From a population register, 1781 controls were randomly selected. Information was obtained from medical records and through telephone interviews. Results: Fifty-seven percent of the cases were males. An expert group found evidence for biliary stones in 50% of the cases, alcohol intake in 23%, but in 29% neither of these factors were present. In all, "other" factors, e.g. drugs, could have contributed to the development of acute pancreatitis in 52% of the cases. In a multivariate analysis, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for H-2 antagonists were 2.4 (95% CI 1.2-4.8) for proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), 2.1 (1.2-3.4) for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), 2.3 (1.3-4.0) for those derived from acetic acid and 1.9 (1.1-3.2) antibacterials for systemic use. Significant ORs were found for a history of gastrointestinal tract disorders [1.5 (1.1-1.9)] and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) [3.4 (1.5-7.9)]. Smoking was significantly associated with acute pancreatitis [1.7 (1.2-2.1)] and, for those smoking more than 20 cigarettes per day, the OR was 4.0 (2.27.5). Alcohol in moderate amounts did not increase the risk, but for those drinking more than 420 g alcohol per week the OR was 4.1 (2.2-7.5). Conclusion: In addition to cholelithiasis, smoking and heavy alcohol use, drugs may be an important risk factor for acute pancreatitis. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
acute pancreatitis, risk factors, case-control study
in
European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
volume
58
issue
4
pages
275 - 283
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:12136374
  • wos:000177241500008
  • scopus:0036020412
ISSN
1432-1041
DOI
10.1007/s00228-002-0471-4
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
16bcf48b-9e4c-4732-a476-601845eca35b (old id 892784)
date added to LUP
2008-01-17 11:36:35
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:35:07
@article{16bcf48b-9e4c-4732-a476-601845eca35b,
  abstract     = {Objective: To evaluate risk factors - notably drugs - for developing acute pancreatitis. Methods: A population-based, case-control study, encompassing 1.4 million inhabitants aged 20-85 years from four regions in Sweden between 1 January 1995 and 31 May 1998. A total of 462 cases were hospitalised in surgical departments with their first episode of acute pancreatitis without previously known biliary stone disease. From a population register, 1781 controls were randomly selected. Information was obtained from medical records and through telephone interviews. Results: Fifty-seven percent of the cases were males. An expert group found evidence for biliary stones in 50% of the cases, alcohol intake in 23%, but in 29% neither of these factors were present. In all, "other" factors, e.g. drugs, could have contributed to the development of acute pancreatitis in 52% of the cases. In a multivariate analysis, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for H-2 antagonists were 2.4 (95% CI 1.2-4.8) for proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), 2.1 (1.2-3.4) for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), 2.3 (1.3-4.0) for those derived from acetic acid and 1.9 (1.1-3.2) antibacterials for systemic use. Significant ORs were found for a history of gastrointestinal tract disorders [1.5 (1.1-1.9)] and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) [3.4 (1.5-7.9)]. Smoking was significantly associated with acute pancreatitis [1.7 (1.2-2.1)] and, for those smoking more than 20 cigarettes per day, the OR was 4.0 (2.27.5). Alcohol in moderate amounts did not increase the risk, but for those drinking more than 420 g alcohol per week the OR was 4.1 (2.2-7.5). Conclusion: In addition to cholelithiasis, smoking and heavy alcohol use, drugs may be an important risk factor for acute pancreatitis.},
  author       = {Blomgren, KB and Sundstrom, A and Steineck, G and Genell, S and Sjostedt, S and Wiholm, BE},
  issn         = {1432-1041},
  keyword      = {acute pancreatitis,risk factors,case-control study},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {275--283},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology},
  title        = {A Swedish case-control network for studies of drug-induced morbidity - acute pancreatitis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00228-002-0471-4},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2002},
}