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Cultured autologous fibroblasts augment epidermal repair

Svensjö, Tor LU ; Yao, F; Pomahac, B; Winkler, T and Eriksson, E (2002) In Transplantation 73(7). p.1033-1041
Abstract
Background. Autologous dermal fibroblasts may be useful in the treatment of skin wounds and for the enhancement of keratinocyte proliferation. This paper addressed the following questions: (1) can cultured fibroblasts (CF) be transplanted as suspensions to full-thickness skin wounds and do they influence wound healing; (2) will the transplanted CF be integrated into the new dermis; (3) can a transgene that encodes a secretable marker, human epidermal growth factor (hEGF), be expressed in the wound fluid by the transplanted CF; and (4) do CF cotransplanted with cultured keratinocytes (CK) influence the rate of wound healing? Methods. Suspensions of CF were transplanted alone or together with CK to full-thickness wounds covered with... (More)
Background. Autologous dermal fibroblasts may be useful in the treatment of skin wounds and for the enhancement of keratinocyte proliferation. This paper addressed the following questions: (1) can cultured fibroblasts (CF) be transplanted as suspensions to full-thickness skin wounds and do they influence wound healing; (2) will the transplanted CF be integrated into the new dermis; (3) can a transgene that encodes a secretable marker, human epidermal growth factor (hEGF), be expressed in the wound fluid by the transplanted CF; and (4) do CF cotransplanted with cultured keratinocytes (CK) influence the rate of wound healing? Methods. Suspensions of CF were transplanted alone or together with CK to full-thickness wounds covered with liquid-containing chambers in an established porcine model. Results. Transplantation of CF accelerated reepithelialization as determined from wound histologies and sequential measurements of protein efflux over the wound surface. CF transfected with a marker gene, beta-galactosidase, resulted in in vivo gene expression and demonstrated that transplanted CF integrated into the developing dermis. Transplantation of hEGF gene-transfected CF resulted in significant hEGF expression in wound fluid. The hEGF levels peaked at day 1 (2450 pg/ml) and then sharply decreased to low levels on day 6. CF cotransplanted with CK led to greater number of keratinocyte colonies in the wound and accelerated reepithelialization as compared with CK alone. Conclusions. Transplanted CF integrated into the dermis, accelerated reepithelialization, and improved the outcome of CK transplantation. CF may also be used for the expression of transgenes in wound and wound fluid. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Transplantation
volume
73
issue
7
pages
1033 - 1041
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:11965028
  • wos:000175364100004
  • scopus:0037091089
ISSN
1534-6080
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
83bd8121-8e6e-4d7e-8553-007b3c05a80f (old id 893425)
date added to LUP
2008-01-23 16:43:06
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:12:17
@article{83bd8121-8e6e-4d7e-8553-007b3c05a80f,
  abstract     = {Background. Autologous dermal fibroblasts may be useful in the treatment of skin wounds and for the enhancement of keratinocyte proliferation. This paper addressed the following questions: (1) can cultured fibroblasts (CF) be transplanted as suspensions to full-thickness skin wounds and do they influence wound healing; (2) will the transplanted CF be integrated into the new dermis; (3) can a transgene that encodes a secretable marker, human epidermal growth factor (hEGF), be expressed in the wound fluid by the transplanted CF; and (4) do CF cotransplanted with cultured keratinocytes (CK) influence the rate of wound healing? Methods. Suspensions of CF were transplanted alone or together with CK to full-thickness wounds covered with liquid-containing chambers in an established porcine model. Results. Transplantation of CF accelerated reepithelialization as determined from wound histologies and sequential measurements of protein efflux over the wound surface. CF transfected with a marker gene, beta-galactosidase, resulted in in vivo gene expression and demonstrated that transplanted CF integrated into the developing dermis. Transplantation of hEGF gene-transfected CF resulted in significant hEGF expression in wound fluid. The hEGF levels peaked at day 1 (2450 pg/ml) and then sharply decreased to low levels on day 6. CF cotransplanted with CK led to greater number of keratinocyte colonies in the wound and accelerated reepithelialization as compared with CK alone. Conclusions. Transplanted CF integrated into the dermis, accelerated reepithelialization, and improved the outcome of CK transplantation. CF may also be used for the expression of transgenes in wound and wound fluid.},
  author       = {Svensjö, Tor and Yao, F and Pomahac, B and Winkler, T and Eriksson, E},
  issn         = {1534-6080},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1033--1041},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Transplantation},
  title        = {Cultured autologous fibroblasts augment epidermal repair},
  volume       = {73},
  year         = {2002},
}