Advanced

A double-blind study comparing the effect of glycerin and urea on dry, eczematous skin in atopic patients

Loden, M; Andersson, AC; Anderson, C; Bergbrant, IM; Frodin, T; Ohman, H; Sandstrom, MH; Sarnhult, T; Voog, E and Stenberg, B, et al. (2002) In Acta Dermato-Venereologica 82(1). p.45-47
Abstract
Moisturizing creams have beneficial effects in the treatment of dry, scaly skin, but they may induce adverse skin reactions. In a randomized double-blind study, 197 patients with atopic dermatitis were treated with one of the following: a new moisturizing cream with 20% glycerin, its cream base without glycerin as placebo, or a cream with 4% urea and 4% sodium chloride. The patients were asked to apply the cream at least once daily for 30 days. Adverse skin reactions and changes in skin dryness were assessed by the patient and a dermatologist. Adverse skin reactions such as smarting (a sharp local superficial sensation) were felt significantly less among patients using the 20% glycerin cream compared with the urea-saline cream, because 10%... (More)
Moisturizing creams have beneficial effects in the treatment of dry, scaly skin, but they may induce adverse skin reactions. In a randomized double-blind study, 197 patients with atopic dermatitis were treated with one of the following: a new moisturizing cream with 20% glycerin, its cream base without glycerin as placebo, or a cream with 4% urea and 4% sodium chloride. The patients were asked to apply the cream at least once daily for 30 days. Adverse skin reactions and changes in skin dryness were assessed by the patient and a dermatologist. Adverse skin reactions such as smarting (a sharp local superficial sensation) were felt significantly less among patients using the 20% glycerin cream compared with the urea-saline cream, because 10% of the patients judged the smarting as severe or moderate when using glycerin cream, whereas 24% did so using urea-saline cream (p<0.0006). No differences were found regarding skin reactions such as stinging, itching and dryness/irritation. The study showed equal effects on skin dryness as judged by the patients and the dermatologist. In conclusion, a glycerin containing cream appears to be a suitable alternative to urea/sodium chloride in the treatment of atopic dry skin. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
, et al. (More)
(Less)
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
emollients, cream, dry skin, moisturizer
in
Acta Dermato-Venereologica
volume
82
issue
1
pages
45 - 47
publisher
Medical Journals Limited
external identifiers
  • pmid:12013198
  • wos:000175356800011
  • scopus:18344391618
ISSN
1651-2057
DOI
10.1080/000155502753600885
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8bfdc824-7d29-49ea-9798-5152340883a7 (old id 893447)
date added to LUP
2008-01-23 17:35:17
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:24:36
@article{8bfdc824-7d29-49ea-9798-5152340883a7,
  abstract     = {Moisturizing creams have beneficial effects in the treatment of dry, scaly skin, but they may induce adverse skin reactions. In a randomized double-blind study, 197 patients with atopic dermatitis were treated with one of the following: a new moisturizing cream with 20% glycerin, its cream base without glycerin as placebo, or a cream with 4% urea and 4% sodium chloride. The patients were asked to apply the cream at least once daily for 30 days. Adverse skin reactions and changes in skin dryness were assessed by the patient and a dermatologist. Adverse skin reactions such as smarting (a sharp local superficial sensation) were felt significantly less among patients using the 20% glycerin cream compared with the urea-saline cream, because 10% of the patients judged the smarting as severe or moderate when using glycerin cream, whereas 24% did so using urea-saline cream (p&lt;0.0006). No differences were found regarding skin reactions such as stinging, itching and dryness/irritation. The study showed equal effects on skin dryness as judged by the patients and the dermatologist. In conclusion, a glycerin containing cream appears to be a suitable alternative to urea/sodium chloride in the treatment of atopic dry skin.},
  author       = {Loden, M and Andersson, AC and Anderson, C and Bergbrant, IM and Frodin, T and Ohman, H and Sandstrom, MH and Sarnhult, T and Voog, E and Stenberg, B and Pawlik, E and Preisler-Haggqvist, A and Svensson, Åke and Lindberg, M},
  issn         = {1651-2057},
  keyword      = {emollients,cream,dry skin,moisturizer},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {45--47},
  publisher    = {Medical Journals Limited},
  series       = {Acta Dermato-Venereologica},
  title        = {A double-blind study comparing the effect of glycerin and urea on dry, eczematous skin in atopic patients},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/000155502753600885},
  volume       = {82},
  year         = {2002},
}