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Autologous skin transplantation: Comparison of minced skin to other techniques

Svensjö, Tor LU ; Pomahac, B; Yao, F; Slama, J; Wasif, N and Eriksson, E (2002) In Journal of Surgical Research 103(1). p.19-29
Abstract
Background. Skin grafting may be necessary to close nonhealing skin wounds. This report describes a fast and minimally invasive method to produce minced skin suitable for transplantation to skin wounds. The technique was evaluated in an established porcine skin wound healing model and was compared to split-thickness skin grafts and suspensions of cultured and noncultured keratinocytes. Materials and methods. The study included 90 wounds on 3 pigs. Fluid-treated full-thickness skin wounds were grafted with minced skin, split-thickness skin grafts, noncultured keratinocytes, or cultured keratinocytes. Controls received either fluid or dry treatment. The wound healing process was analyzed in histologies collected at Days 8 to 43 postwounding.... (More)
Background. Skin grafting may be necessary to close nonhealing skin wounds. This report describes a fast and minimally invasive method to produce minced skin suitable for transplantation to skin wounds. The technique was evaluated in an established porcine skin wound healing model and was compared to split-thickness skin grafts and suspensions of cultured and noncultured keratinocytes. Materials and methods. The study included 90 wounds on 3 pigs. Fluid-treated full-thickness skin wounds were grafted with minced skin, split-thickness skin grafts, noncultured keratinocytes, or cultured keratinocytes. Controls received either fluid or dry treatment. The wound healing process was analyzed in histologies collected at Days 8 to 43 postwounding. Wound contraction was quantified by photoplanimetry. Results. Wounds transplanted with minced skin and keratinocyte suspension contained several colonies of keratinocytes in the newly formed granulation tissue. During the healing phase, the colonies progressed upward and reepithelialization was accelerated. Minced skin and split-thickness skin grafts reduced contraction as compared to keratinocyte suspensions and saline controls. Granulation tissue formation was also reduced in split-thickness skin-grafted wounds. Conclusions. Minced skin grafting accelerates reepithelialization of fluid-treated skin wounds. The technique is faster and less expensive than split-thickness skin grafting and keratinocyte suspension transplantation. Minced skin grafting may have implications for the treatment of chronic wounds. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA). (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cultured cells, wound healing, pig, microskin grafting
in
Journal of Surgical Research
volume
103
issue
1
pages
19 - 29
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000174189400004
  • pmid:11855913
  • scopus:0036352948
ISSN
1095-8673
DOI
10.1006/jsre.2001.6331
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d748d990-1ea4-4322-b872-117515c82e6f (old id 893731)
date added to LUP
2008-01-23 16:41:10
date last changed
2017-07-30 04:37:31
@article{d748d990-1ea4-4322-b872-117515c82e6f,
  abstract     = {Background. Skin grafting may be necessary to close nonhealing skin wounds. This report describes a fast and minimally invasive method to produce minced skin suitable for transplantation to skin wounds. The technique was evaluated in an established porcine skin wound healing model and was compared to split-thickness skin grafts and suspensions of cultured and noncultured keratinocytes. Materials and methods. The study included 90 wounds on 3 pigs. Fluid-treated full-thickness skin wounds were grafted with minced skin, split-thickness skin grafts, noncultured keratinocytes, or cultured keratinocytes. Controls received either fluid or dry treatment. The wound healing process was analyzed in histologies collected at Days 8 to 43 postwounding. Wound contraction was quantified by photoplanimetry. Results. Wounds transplanted with minced skin and keratinocyte suspension contained several colonies of keratinocytes in the newly formed granulation tissue. During the healing phase, the colonies progressed upward and reepithelialization was accelerated. Minced skin and split-thickness skin grafts reduced contraction as compared to keratinocyte suspensions and saline controls. Granulation tissue formation was also reduced in split-thickness skin-grafted wounds. Conclusions. Minced skin grafting accelerates reepithelialization of fluid-treated skin wounds. The technique is faster and less expensive than split-thickness skin grafting and keratinocyte suspension transplantation. Minced skin grafting may have implications for the treatment of chronic wounds. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).},
  author       = {Svensjö, Tor and Pomahac, B and Yao, F and Slama, J and Wasif, N and Eriksson, E},
  issn         = {1095-8673},
  keyword      = {cultured cells,wound healing,pig,microskin grafting},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {19--29},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Surgical Research},
  title        = {Autologous skin transplantation: Comparison of minced skin to other techniques},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/jsre.2001.6331},
  volume       = {103},
  year         = {2002},
}