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The secret of the transmission of the unwritten Jesus tradition

Gerhardsson, Birger LU (2005) In New Testament Studies 51. p.1-18
Abstract
Gospel research has drawn upon studies of folklore from time to time. An initial impetus from J. G. Herder was followed up by the work of the form critics. More recently, W. H. Kelber introduced to the debate a model based on modern folklore studies and linguistic theory known as 'oral culture' or 'orality'. He stressed the differences between oral ways of thinking, speaking, and transmitting tradition and the thought and communication characteristic of a modern, print-dominated culture: exegesis and hermenutics, he insisted, must be attuned to the former. Drawing largely on Kelber, J. D. G. Dunn has developed this program in a rather radical form in his new book, Jesus Remembered. Through a series of comparisons between Dunn's approach... (More)
Gospel research has drawn upon studies of folklore from time to time. An initial impetus from J. G. Herder was followed up by the work of the form critics. More recently, W. H. Kelber introduced to the debate a model based on modern folklore studies and linguistic theory known as 'oral culture' or 'orality'. He stressed the differences between oral ways of thinking, speaking, and transmitting tradition and the thought and communication characteristic of a modern, print-dominated culture: exegesis and hermenutics, he insisted, must be attuned to the former. Drawing largely on Kelber, J. D. G. Dunn has developed this program in a rather radical form in his new book, Jesus Remembered. Through a series of comparisons between Dunn's approach and the author's own, this article argues that the orality model, even in this latest form, fails to provide an adequate solution to the mystery of the oral gospel tradition. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
New Testament Studies
volume
51
pages
1 - 18
publisher
Cambridge University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000227791100001
  • scopus:61949292445
ISSN
0028-6885
DOI
10.1017/S0028688505000019
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fb6c0726-fcc2-4118-81e7-78268a6e299a (old id 895038)
date added to LUP
2008-01-16 09:22:47
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:03:46
@article{fb6c0726-fcc2-4118-81e7-78268a6e299a,
  abstract     = {Gospel research has drawn upon studies of folklore from time to time. An initial impetus from J. G. Herder was followed up by the work of the form critics. More recently, W. H. Kelber introduced to the debate a model based on modern folklore studies and linguistic theory known as 'oral culture' or 'orality'. He stressed the differences between oral ways of thinking, speaking, and transmitting tradition and the thought and communication characteristic of a modern, print-dominated culture: exegesis and hermenutics, he insisted, must be attuned to the former. Drawing largely on Kelber, J. D. G. Dunn has developed this program in a rather radical form in his new book, Jesus Remembered. Through a series of comparisons between Dunn's approach and the author's own, this article argues that the orality model, even in this latest form, fails to provide an adequate solution to the mystery of the oral gospel tradition.},
  author       = {Gerhardsson, Birger},
  issn         = {0028-6885},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--18},
  publisher    = {Cambridge University Press},
  series       = {New Testament Studies},
  title        = {The secret of the transmission of the unwritten Jesus tradition},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0028688505000019},
  volume       = {51},
  year         = {2005},
}