Advanced

Nodule detection in digital chest radiography: Part of image background acting as pure noise

Bath, M; Hakansson, M; Borjesson, S; Kheddache, S; Grahn, Anna LU ; Bochud, FO; Verdun, FR and Mansson, LG (2005) In Radiation Protection Dosimetry 114(1-3). p.102-108
Abstract
There are several factors that influence the radiologist's ability to detect a specific structure/lesion in a radiograph. Three factors that are commonly known to be of major importance are the signal itself, the system noise and the projected anatomy. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent the image background acts as pure noise for the detection of subtle lung nodules in five different regions of the chest. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study with five observers was conducted on two different sets of images, clinical chest X-ray images and images with a similar power spectrum as the clinical images but with a random phase spectrum, resulting in an image background containing pure noise. Simulated designer... (More)
There are several factors that influence the radiologist's ability to detect a specific structure/lesion in a radiograph. Three factors that are commonly known to be of major importance are the signal itself, the system noise and the projected anatomy. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent the image background acts as pure noise for the detection of subtle lung nodules in five different regions of the chest. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study with five observers was conducted on two different sets of images, clinical chest X-ray images and images with a similar power spectrum as the clinical images but with a random phase spectrum, resulting in an image background containing pure noise. Simulated designer nodules with a full-width-at-fifth-maximum of 10 mm but with varying contrasts were added to the images. As a measure of the part of the image background that acts as pure noise, the ratio between the contrast needed to obtain an area under the ROC curve of 0.80 in the clinical images to that in the random-phase images was used. The ratio ranged from 0.40 (in the lateral pulmonary regions) to 0.83 (in the hilar regions) indicating that there was a large difference between different regions regarding to what extent the image background acted as pure noise. and that in the hilar regions the image background almost completely acted as pure noise for the detection of 10 turn nodules. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Radiation Protection Dosimetry
volume
114
issue
1-3
pages
102 - 108
publisher
Nuclear Technology Publishing
external identifiers
  • wos:000229927400016
  • pmid:15933089
  • scopus:21244483935
ISSN
1742-3406
DOI
10.1093/rpd/nch523
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ca7cd940-21a0-4cf5-858e-7631f2d8e73a (old id 895203)
date added to LUP
2008-01-11 11:09:33
date last changed
2017-09-24 04:29:21
@article{ca7cd940-21a0-4cf5-858e-7631f2d8e73a,
  abstract     = {There are several factors that influence the radiologist's ability to detect a specific structure/lesion in a radiograph. Three factors that are commonly known to be of major importance are the signal itself, the system noise and the projected anatomy. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent the image background acts as pure noise for the detection of subtle lung nodules in five different regions of the chest. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) study with five observers was conducted on two different sets of images, clinical chest X-ray images and images with a similar power spectrum as the clinical images but with a random phase spectrum, resulting in an image background containing pure noise. Simulated designer nodules with a full-width-at-fifth-maximum of 10 mm but with varying contrasts were added to the images. As a measure of the part of the image background that acts as pure noise, the ratio between the contrast needed to obtain an area under the ROC curve of 0.80 in the clinical images to that in the random-phase images was used. The ratio ranged from 0.40 (in the lateral pulmonary regions) to 0.83 (in the hilar regions) indicating that there was a large difference between different regions regarding to what extent the image background acted as pure noise. and that in the hilar regions the image background almost completely acted as pure noise for the detection of 10 turn nodules.},
  author       = {Bath, M and Hakansson, M and Borjesson, S and Kheddache, S and Grahn, Anna and Bochud, FO and Verdun, FR and Mansson, LG},
  issn         = {1742-3406},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-3},
  pages        = {102--108},
  publisher    = {Nuclear Technology Publishing},
  series       = {Radiation Protection Dosimetry},
  title        = {Nodule detection in digital chest radiography: Part of image background acting as pure noise},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rpd/nch523},
  volume       = {114},
  year         = {2005},
}