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Method of simulating dose reduction for digital radiographic systems

Bath, M; Hakansson, M; Tingberg, Anders LU and Mansson, LG (2005) In Radiation Protection Dosimetry 114(1-3). p.253-259
Abstract
The optimisation of image quality vs. radiation dose is an important task in medical imaging. To obtain maximum validity of the optimisation, it must be based on clinical images. Images at different dose levels can then either be obtained by collecting patient images at the different dose levels sought to investigate-including additional exposures and permission from an ethical committee-or by manipulating images to simulate different dose levels. The aim of the present work was to develop a method of simulating dose reduction for digital radiographic systems. The method uses information about the detective quantum efficiency and noise power spectrum at the original and simulated dose levels to create an image containing filtered noise.... (More)
The optimisation of image quality vs. radiation dose is an important task in medical imaging. To obtain maximum validity of the optimisation, it must be based on clinical images. Images at different dose levels can then either be obtained by collecting patient images at the different dose levels sought to investigate-including additional exposures and permission from an ethical committee-or by manipulating images to simulate different dose levels. The aim of the present work was to develop a method of simulating dose reduction for digital radiographic systems. The method uses information about the detective quantum efficiency and noise power spectrum at the original and simulated dose levels to create an image containing filtered noise. When added to the original image this results in an image with noise which, in terms of frequency content, agrees with the noise present in an image collected at the simulated dose level. To increase the validity, the method takes local dose variations in the original image into account. The method was tested on a computed radiography system and was shown to produce images with noise behaviour similar to that of images actually collected at the simulated dose levels. The method can, therefore, be used to modify an image collected at one dose level so that it simulates an image of the same object collected at any lower dose level. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Radiation Protection Dosimetry
volume
114
issue
1-3
pages
253 - 259
publisher
Nuclear Technology Publishing
external identifiers
  • wos:000229927400044
  • pmid:15933117
  • scopus:21244435246
ISSN
1742-3406
DOI
10.1093/rpd/nch540
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9e0f3235-fd08-4374-aac0-6e76ca194d39 (old id 895222)
date added to LUP
2008-01-11 11:11:21
date last changed
2017-09-24 04:20:10
@article{9e0f3235-fd08-4374-aac0-6e76ca194d39,
  abstract     = {The optimisation of image quality vs. radiation dose is an important task in medical imaging. To obtain maximum validity of the optimisation, it must be based on clinical images. Images at different dose levels can then either be obtained by collecting patient images at the different dose levels sought to investigate-including additional exposures and permission from an ethical committee-or by manipulating images to simulate different dose levels. The aim of the present work was to develop a method of simulating dose reduction for digital radiographic systems. The method uses information about the detective quantum efficiency and noise power spectrum at the original and simulated dose levels to create an image containing filtered noise. When added to the original image this results in an image with noise which, in terms of frequency content, agrees with the noise present in an image collected at the simulated dose level. To increase the validity, the method takes local dose variations in the original image into account. The method was tested on a computed radiography system and was shown to produce images with noise behaviour similar to that of images actually collected at the simulated dose levels. The method can, therefore, be used to modify an image collected at one dose level so that it simulates an image of the same object collected at any lower dose level.},
  author       = {Bath, M and Hakansson, M and Tingberg, Anders and Mansson, LG},
  issn         = {1742-3406},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-3},
  pages        = {253--259},
  publisher    = {Nuclear Technology Publishing},
  series       = {Radiation Protection Dosimetry},
  title        = {Method of simulating dose reduction for digital radiographic systems},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rpd/nch540},
  volume       = {114},
  year         = {2005},
}