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Reduction of high cholesterol levels associated with younger age and longer education in a primary health care programme for cardiovascular prevention

Hellenius, ML; Nilsson, Peter LU ; Elofsson, S; Johansson, J and Krakau, I (2005) In Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care 23(2). p.75-81
Abstract
Objective. To study possible social predictors for reduction of hyperlipidaemia in subjects offered lifestyle intervention in primary health care after an opportunistic screening. Setting. Primary health care in Sollentuna, Sweden. Design. Follow-up study of changes in high lipid levels in men and women aged 20-60 years participating in a voluntary screening and cardiovascular prevention programme. Subjects and main outcome measures. A total of 1904 individuals had a follow-up visit registered after a mean of 466 days. Men and women with raised lipid levels (serum cholesterol≥ 6.5 mmol/l, and/or triglycerides≥ 2.3 mmol/l) at baseline were compared with normolipidaemic participants. Data on social characteristics such as... (More)
Objective. To study possible social predictors for reduction of hyperlipidaemia in subjects offered lifestyle intervention in primary health care after an opportunistic screening. Setting. Primary health care in Sollentuna, Sweden. Design. Follow-up study of changes in high lipid levels in men and women aged 20-60 years participating in a voluntary screening and cardiovascular prevention programme. Subjects and main outcome measures. A total of 1904 individuals had a follow-up visit registered after a mean of 466 days. Men and women with raised lipid levels (serum cholesterol&GE; 6.5 mmol/l, and/or triglycerides&GE; 2.3 mmol/l) at baseline were compared with normolipidaemic participants. Data on social characteristics such as education, occupation, marital status, and income were collected from national censuses. Associations between socioeconomic factors and changes in lipid levels were studied. Results. Men and women with hyperlipidaemia were generally (p<0.001) older (men 6-8 years, women 8-10 years) and less educated than normolipidaemic subjects. Significant predictors for reducing hypercholesterolaemia were younger age, OR 0.97 (0.95-1.00) for increasing age, and longer education, OR 0.47 (0.24-0.91) for low education (<9 years). Foreign-born subjects were more likely to achieve a high success rate in reducing hypercholesterolaemia, OR 3.43 (1.00-11.8), than the Swedish-born. No significant predictors were detected for reduction of high triglyceride levels. Conclusion. A successful reduction of high cholesterol levels was associated with younger age and longer education in a primary health care-based programme for cardiovascular prevention. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
prevention, socioeconomic factors, hyperlipidaemia, intervention
in
Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care
volume
23
issue
2
pages
75 - 81
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:16036545
  • wos:000228992900003
  • scopus:21344440983
ISSN
0281-3432
DOI
10.1080/02813430510018365
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
853a661f-92a1-42c3-a741-ed7678526b83 (old id 895464)
date added to LUP
2008-01-16 10:43:24
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:24:29
@article{853a661f-92a1-42c3-a741-ed7678526b83,
  abstract     = {Objective. To study possible social predictors for reduction of hyperlipidaemia in subjects offered lifestyle intervention in primary health care after an opportunistic screening. Setting. Primary health care in Sollentuna, Sweden. Design. Follow-up study of changes in high lipid levels in men and women aged 20-60 years participating in a voluntary screening and cardiovascular prevention programme. Subjects and main outcome measures. A total of 1904 individuals had a follow-up visit registered after a mean of 466 days. Men and women with raised lipid levels (serum cholesterol&amp;GE; 6.5 mmol/l, and/or triglycerides&amp;GE; 2.3 mmol/l) at baseline were compared with normolipidaemic participants. Data on social characteristics such as education, occupation, marital status, and income were collected from national censuses. Associations between socioeconomic factors and changes in lipid levels were studied. Results. Men and women with hyperlipidaemia were generally (p&lt;0.001) older (men 6-8 years, women 8-10 years) and less educated than normolipidaemic subjects. Significant predictors for reducing hypercholesterolaemia were younger age, OR 0.97 (0.95-1.00) for increasing age, and longer education, OR 0.47 (0.24-0.91) for low education (&lt;9 years). Foreign-born subjects were more likely to achieve a high success rate in reducing hypercholesterolaemia, OR 3.43 (1.00-11.8), than the Swedish-born. No significant predictors were detected for reduction of high triglyceride levels. Conclusion. A successful reduction of high cholesterol levels was associated with younger age and longer education in a primary health care-based programme for cardiovascular prevention.},
  author       = {Hellenius, ML and Nilsson, Peter and Elofsson, S and Johansson, J and Krakau, I},
  issn         = {0281-3432},
  keyword      = {prevention,socioeconomic factors,hyperlipidaemia,intervention},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {75--81},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care},
  title        = {Reduction of high cholesterol levels associated with younger age and longer education in a primary health care programme for cardiovascular prevention},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02813430510018365},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2005},
}