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Can we define patients with no chance of survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?

Herlitz, J; Engdahl, J; Svensson, L; Young, Marie LU ; Angquist, KA and Holmberg, S (2004) In Heart 90(10). p.1114-1118
Abstract
Objective: To evaluate whether subgroups of patients with no chance of survival can be defined among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Patients: Patients in the Swedish cardiac arrest registry who fulfilled the following criteria were surveyed: cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was attempted; the arrest was not crew witnessed; and patients were found in a non-shockable rhythm. Setting: Various ambulance organisations in Sweden. Design: Prospective observational study. Results: Among the 16 712 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, the following factors were independently associated with a lower chance of survival one month after cardiac arrest: no bystander CPR; non-witnessed cardiac arrest; cardiac arrest occurring... (More)
Objective: To evaluate whether subgroups of patients with no chance of survival can be defined among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Patients: Patients in the Swedish cardiac arrest registry who fulfilled the following criteria were surveyed: cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was attempted; the arrest was not crew witnessed; and patients were found in a non-shockable rhythm. Setting: Various ambulance organisations in Sweden. Design: Prospective observational study. Results: Among the 16 712 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, the following factors were independently associated with a lower chance of survival one month after cardiac arrest: no bystander CPR; non-witnessed cardiac arrest; cardiac arrest occurring at home; increasing interval between call for and arrival of the ambulance; and increasing age. When these factors were considered simultaneously two groups with no survivors were defined. In both groups patients were found in a non-shockable rhythm, no bystander CPR was attempted, the arrest was non-witnessed, the arrest took place at home. In one group the interval between call for and arrival of ambulance exceeded 12 minutes. In the other group patients were older than 80 years and the interval between call for and arrival of the ambulance exceeded eight minutes. Conclusion: Among patients who had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and were found in a non-shockable rhythm the following factors were associated with a low chance of survival: no bystander CPR, non-witnessed cardiac arrest, the arrest took place at home, increasing interval between call for and arrival of ambulance, and increasing age. When these factors were considered simultaneously, groups with no survivors could be defined. In such groups the ambulance crew may refrain from starting CPR. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Heart
volume
90
issue
10
pages
1114 - 1118
publisher
BMJ Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • pmid:15367502
  • wos:000223861900005
  • scopus:4644302402
ISSN
1355-6037
DOI
10.1136/hrt.2003.029348
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bec95234-5fad-4232-b078-324806105ece (old id 898453)
date added to LUP
2008-01-10 16:46:36
date last changed
2017-07-09 03:29:48
@article{bec95234-5fad-4232-b078-324806105ece,
  abstract     = {Objective: To evaluate whether subgroups of patients with no chance of survival can be defined among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Patients: Patients in the Swedish cardiac arrest registry who fulfilled the following criteria were surveyed: cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was attempted; the arrest was not crew witnessed; and patients were found in a non-shockable rhythm. Setting: Various ambulance organisations in Sweden. Design: Prospective observational study. Results: Among the 16 712 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, the following factors were independently associated with a lower chance of survival one month after cardiac arrest: no bystander CPR; non-witnessed cardiac arrest; cardiac arrest occurring at home; increasing interval between call for and arrival of the ambulance; and increasing age. When these factors were considered simultaneously two groups with no survivors were defined. In both groups patients were found in a non-shockable rhythm, no bystander CPR was attempted, the arrest was non-witnessed, the arrest took place at home. In one group the interval between call for and arrival of ambulance exceeded 12 minutes. In the other group patients were older than 80 years and the interval between call for and arrival of the ambulance exceeded eight minutes. Conclusion: Among patients who had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and were found in a non-shockable rhythm the following factors were associated with a low chance of survival: no bystander CPR, non-witnessed cardiac arrest, the arrest took place at home, increasing interval between call for and arrival of ambulance, and increasing age. When these factors were considered simultaneously, groups with no survivors could be defined. In such groups the ambulance crew may refrain from starting CPR.},
  author       = {Herlitz, J and Engdahl, J and Svensson, L and Young, Marie and Angquist, KA and Holmberg, S},
  issn         = {1355-6037},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {1114--1118},
  publisher    = {BMJ Publishing Group},
  series       = {Heart},
  title        = {Can we define patients with no chance of survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/hrt.2003.029348},
  volume       = {90},
  year         = {2004},
}