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Coercion in psychiatric care - patients' and relatives' experiences from four Swedish psychiatric services

Kjellin, L; Andersson, K; Bartholdson, E; Candefjord, IL; Holmstrom, H; Jacobsson, L; Sandlund, M; Wallsten, T and Östman, Margareta LU (2004) In Nordic Journal of Psychiatry 58(2). p.153-159
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore possible regional differences in the use of coercion in psychiatric care as experienced by patients and relatives. At four psychiatric care settings in different parts of Sweden, 138 committed and 144 voluntarily admitted patients were interviewed at admission using the Nordic Admission Interview. At discharge or, if the care episode was still ongoing, after 3 weeks of care, a follow-up patient interview and an interview with 162 relatives of these patients took place. In one of the centers, where involuntarily admitted patients were treated without locking the doors of the wards, the patients reported less coercion at admission than in the other three centers. Regarding the patients' reports of the use... (More)
The aim of this study was to explore possible regional differences in the use of coercion in psychiatric care as experienced by patients and relatives. At four psychiatric care settings in different parts of Sweden, 138 committed and 144 voluntarily admitted patients were interviewed at admission using the Nordic Admission Interview. At discharge or, if the care episode was still ongoing, after 3 weeks of care, a follow-up patient interview and an interview with 162 relatives of these patients took place. In one of the centers, where involuntarily admitted patients were treated without locking the doors of the wards, the patients reported less coercion at admission than in the other three centers. Regarding the patients' reports of the use of coercive measures, personal treatment and outcome of care, and concerning the relatives' experiences, few differences were found between centers among committed and voluntarily admitted patients, respectively. Coercion in psychiatric care, as reported by patients and relatives, was not always legally based, and many of the patients reported they felt violated during the admission process. Only a minority of patients and relatives reported participation in treatment and care planning, as regulated by law. Still, a majority of both committed and voluntarily admitted patients reported they had been well treated by the personnel at admission as well as during the stay at the ward, and that they had been improved in their mental health after the psychiatric care episode. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
relatives, perceived coercion, compulsory psychiatric care, patients
in
Nordic Journal of Psychiatry
volume
58
issue
2
pages
153 - 159
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • pmid:15204222
  • wos:000220690500091
  • scopus:2442536200
ISSN
1502-4725
DOI
10.1080/08039480410005549
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3bc8d072-c2af-4378-97c9-a5c792a59a29 (old id 899126)
date added to LUP
2008-01-15 12:54:24
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:04:33
@article{3bc8d072-c2af-4378-97c9-a5c792a59a29,
  abstract     = {The aim of this study was to explore possible regional differences in the use of coercion in psychiatric care as experienced by patients and relatives. At four psychiatric care settings in different parts of Sweden, 138 committed and 144 voluntarily admitted patients were interviewed at admission using the Nordic Admission Interview. At discharge or, if the care episode was still ongoing, after 3 weeks of care, a follow-up patient interview and an interview with 162 relatives of these patients took place. In one of the centers, where involuntarily admitted patients were treated without locking the doors of the wards, the patients reported less coercion at admission than in the other three centers. Regarding the patients' reports of the use of coercive measures, personal treatment and outcome of care, and concerning the relatives' experiences, few differences were found between centers among committed and voluntarily admitted patients, respectively. Coercion in psychiatric care, as reported by patients and relatives, was not always legally based, and many of the patients reported they felt violated during the admission process. Only a minority of patients and relatives reported participation in treatment and care planning, as regulated by law. Still, a majority of both committed and voluntarily admitted patients reported they had been well treated by the personnel at admission as well as during the stay at the ward, and that they had been improved in their mental health after the psychiatric care episode.},
  author       = {Kjellin, L and Andersson, K and Bartholdson, E and Candefjord, IL and Holmstrom, H and Jacobsson, L and Sandlund, M and Wallsten, T and Östman, Margareta},
  issn         = {1502-4725},
  keyword      = {relatives,perceived coercion,compulsory psychiatric care,patients},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {153--159},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Nordic Journal of Psychiatry},
  title        = {Coercion in psychiatric care - patients' and relatives' experiences from four Swedish psychiatric services},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08039480410005549},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2004},
}