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Is female sex associated with increased survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?

Herlitz, J; Engdahl, J; Svensson, L; Young, Marie LU ; Angquist, KA and Holmberg, S (2004) In Resuscitation 60(2). p.197-203
Abstract
Aim: To evaluate survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to sex. Methods: All patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry between 1990 and 2000 in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was attempted and who did not have a crew witnessed arrest were included. The registry covers 85% of the inhabitants of Sweden (approximately 8 million inhabitants). P-values were adjusted to differences in age. Survival was defined as patients being hospitalised alive and being alive one month after cardiac arrest. In all, 23,797 patients participated in the survey of which 27.9% were women. Results: Among women 16.4% were hospitalised alive versus 13.2% among men (P < 0.001). After... (More)
Aim: To evaluate survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to sex. Methods: All patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry between 1990 and 2000 in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was attempted and who did not have a crew witnessed arrest were included. The registry covers 85% of the inhabitants of Sweden (approximately 8 million inhabitants). P-values were adjusted to differences in age. Survival was defined as patients being hospitalised alive and being alive one month after cardiac arrest. In all, 23,797 patients participated in the survey of which 27.9% were women. Results: Among women 16.4% were hospitalised alive versus 13.2% among men (P < 0.001). After one month 3.0% among women were alive versus 3.4% among men (NS). In a multivariate analysis considering differences in age and various factors at resuscitation female sex was an independent predictor for patients being hospitalised alive (odds ratio 1.66; 95% confidence limits 1.49-1.84) and for being alive after one month (odds ratio 1.27; 95% confidence limits 1.03-1.56). Women differed from men as they were older (P < 0.001), had a lower prevalence of witnessed cardiac arrest (P = 0.01), a lower occurrence of bystander CPR (P < 0.001), a lower occurrence of ventricular fibrillation as initial arrhythmia (P < 0.001) and a lower occurrence of cardiac disease judged to be the cause of cardiac arrest (P < 0.0001). On the other hand they had a cardiac arrest at home more frequently (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Among patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden which was not crew witnessed and in whom resuscitation efforts were attempted, female sex was associated with an increased survival. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
prognosis, cardiac arrest, sex
in
Resuscitation
volume
60
issue
2
pages
197 - 203
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000220012100011
  • pmid:15036738
  • scopus:1242269823
ISSN
1873-1570
DOI
10.1016/j.resuscitation.2003.09.012
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2ad704f5-ab43-4035-9b1a-4737cbc0ba31 (old id 899224)
date added to LUP
2008-01-10 16:50:46
date last changed
2017-07-23 03:44:47
@article{2ad704f5-ab43-4035-9b1a-4737cbc0ba31,
  abstract     = {Aim: To evaluate survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to sex. Methods: All patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry between 1990 and 2000 in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was attempted and who did not have a crew witnessed arrest were included. The registry covers 85% of the inhabitants of Sweden (approximately 8 million inhabitants). P-values were adjusted to differences in age. Survival was defined as patients being hospitalised alive and being alive one month after cardiac arrest. In all, 23,797 patients participated in the survey of which 27.9% were women. Results: Among women 16.4% were hospitalised alive versus 13.2% among men (P &lt; 0.001). After one month 3.0% among women were alive versus 3.4% among men (NS). In a multivariate analysis considering differences in age and various factors at resuscitation female sex was an independent predictor for patients being hospitalised alive (odds ratio 1.66; 95% confidence limits 1.49-1.84) and for being alive after one month (odds ratio 1.27; 95% confidence limits 1.03-1.56). Women differed from men as they were older (P &lt; 0.001), had a lower prevalence of witnessed cardiac arrest (P = 0.01), a lower occurrence of bystander CPR (P &lt; 0.001), a lower occurrence of ventricular fibrillation as initial arrhythmia (P &lt; 0.001) and a lower occurrence of cardiac disease judged to be the cause of cardiac arrest (P &lt; 0.0001). On the other hand they had a cardiac arrest at home more frequently (P &lt; 0.001). Conclusion: Among patients suffering out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Sweden which was not crew witnessed and in whom resuscitation efforts were attempted, female sex was associated with an increased survival. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Herlitz, J and Engdahl, J and Svensson, L and Young, Marie and Angquist, KA and Holmberg, S},
  issn         = {1873-1570},
  keyword      = {prognosis,cardiac arrest,sex},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {197--203},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Resuscitation},
  title        = {Is female sex associated with increased survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2003.09.012},
  volume       = {60},
  year         = {2004},
}