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A method of predicting workload and staffing level for radiotherapy treatment planning as plan complexity changes

Holmberg, Ola LU and McClean, B (2003) In Clinical Oncology 15(6). p.359-363
Abstract
When assessing the impact on workload from an expanding number of new patients and increasing treatment complexity, radiotherapy clinics find that oversimplified workload parameters, such as number of patients or number of fields, are not suitable for managing and predicting workload and organisational dimension. Although the basic treatment equivalent concept is available for predicting linear accelerator utilisation, no corresponding parameter has been available for radiotherapy treatment planning. In this study, we derive a simple workload indicator for treatment planning. The dose plan unit (DPU) takes the complexity of the treatment plan into account. Categorising plans according to complexity in their production, and measuring... (More)
When assessing the impact on workload from an expanding number of new patients and increasing treatment complexity, radiotherapy clinics find that oversimplified workload parameters, such as number of patients or number of fields, are not suitable for managing and predicting workload and organisational dimension. Although the basic treatment equivalent concept is available for predicting linear accelerator utilisation, no corresponding parameter has been available for radiotherapy treatment planning. In this study, we derive a simple workload indicator for treatment planning. The dose plan unit (DPU) takes the complexity of the treatment plan into account. Categorising plans according to complexity in their production, and measuring corresponding time for completing the plans in these categories, leads to the following baseline values for workload prediction: I DPU (non-computed tomography [CT]), 3 DPU (CT-contour) and 6 DPU (full-CT). The measured average productivity of 0.65 DPU per hour (1 standard deviation, SD=0.08 DPU), or alternatively 1 DPU=92 min, for a dosimetrist in this clinic indicates that 79.0 DPU can be produced by each dosimetrist per month within normal working hours. The predictive power of the DPU is shown in terms of using it to quantify the impact on workload in treatment planning of changing treatment protocols for a particular anatomic treatment site. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
radiotherapy complexity, staffing level, workload, treatment planning
in
Clinical Oncology
volume
15
issue
6
pages
359 - 363
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:14524491
  • wos:000185276900010
  • scopus:0042412059
ISSN
1433-2981
DOI
10.1016/S0936-6555(03)00159-6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
26e2cec7-4f30-4f54-9b16-1ae1a87c5ba5 (old id 899981)
date added to LUP
2008-01-14 10:08:22
date last changed
2018-01-07 05:20:51
@article{26e2cec7-4f30-4f54-9b16-1ae1a87c5ba5,
  abstract     = {When assessing the impact on workload from an expanding number of new patients and increasing treatment complexity, radiotherapy clinics find that oversimplified workload parameters, such as number of patients or number of fields, are not suitable for managing and predicting workload and organisational dimension. Although the basic treatment equivalent concept is available for predicting linear accelerator utilisation, no corresponding parameter has been available for radiotherapy treatment planning. In this study, we derive a simple workload indicator for treatment planning. The dose plan unit (DPU) takes the complexity of the treatment plan into account. Categorising plans according to complexity in their production, and measuring corresponding time for completing the plans in these categories, leads to the following baseline values for workload prediction: I DPU (non-computed tomography [CT]), 3 DPU (CT-contour) and 6 DPU (full-CT). The measured average productivity of 0.65 DPU per hour (1 standard deviation, SD=0.08 DPU), or alternatively 1 DPU=92 min, for a dosimetrist in this clinic indicates that 79.0 DPU can be produced by each dosimetrist per month within normal working hours. The predictive power of the DPU is shown in terms of using it to quantify the impact on workload in treatment planning of changing treatment protocols for a particular anatomic treatment site.},
  author       = {Holmberg, Ola and McClean, B},
  issn         = {1433-2981},
  keyword      = {radiotherapy complexity,staffing level,workload,treatment planning},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {359--363},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Clinical Oncology},
  title        = {A method of predicting workload and staffing level for radiotherapy treatment planning as plan complexity changes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0936-6555(03)00159-6},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2003},
}