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Kangaroo mother care helps fathers of preterm infants gain confidence in the paternal role

Blomqvist, Ylva Thernström; Rubertsson, Christine LU ; Kylberg, Elisabeth; Jöreskog, Karin and Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg (2012) In Journal of Advanced Nursing 68(9). p.1988-1996
Abstract

Aim. This article is a report on a descriptive study of fathers' experiences of providing their preterm infants with Kangaroo Mother Care. Background. During neonatal intensive care, fathers describe the incubator as a barrier and the separation from their infant as stressful. Fathers consider it important to be close to the infant, and performing Kangaroo Mother Care makes them feel an important participant in their infants' care. Method. Individual interviews conducted in 2009 with seven fathers who performed Kangaroo Mother Care were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The fathers' opportunity for being close to their infants facilitated attainment of their paternal role in the neonatal intensive care unit. Kangaroo... (More)

Aim. This article is a report on a descriptive study of fathers' experiences of providing their preterm infants with Kangaroo Mother Care. Background. During neonatal intensive care, fathers describe the incubator as a barrier and the separation from their infant as stressful. Fathers consider it important to be close to the infant, and performing Kangaroo Mother Care makes them feel an important participant in their infants' care. Method. Individual interviews conducted in 2009 with seven fathers who performed Kangaroo Mother Care were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The fathers' opportunity for being close to their infants facilitated attainment of their paternal role in the neonatal intensive care unit. Kangaroo Mother Care allowed them to feel in control and that they were doing something good for their infant, although the infant's care could be demanding and stressful. As active agents in their infant's care, some fathers stayed with the infant during the whole hospital stay, others were at the neonatal intensive care unit all day long. Despite the un-wished-for situation, they adapted to their predicament and spent as much time as possible with their infants. Conclusion. Fathers' opportunities for Kangaroo Mother Care helped them to attain their paternal role and to cope with the unexpected situation. The physical environment and conflicting staff statements influenced their opportunity for, and experience of, caring for their preterm infants.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Father, Infant, Kangaroo Mother Care, Neonatal intensive care unit, Nursing
in
Journal of Advanced Nursing
volume
68
issue
9
pages
9 pages
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:84864323330
ISSN
0309-2402
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2648.2011.05886.x
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
89c48e2b-0be3-496f-979c-86ebbbafcb21
date added to LUP
2017-10-27 14:00:38
date last changed
2017-10-30 13:39:03
@article{89c48e2b-0be3-496f-979c-86ebbbafcb21,
  abstract     = {<p>Aim. This article is a report on a descriptive study of fathers' experiences of providing their preterm infants with Kangaroo Mother Care. Background. During neonatal intensive care, fathers describe the incubator as a barrier and the separation from their infant as stressful. Fathers consider it important to be close to the infant, and performing Kangaroo Mother Care makes them feel an important participant in their infants' care. Method. Individual interviews conducted in 2009 with seven fathers who performed Kangaroo Mother Care were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results. The fathers' opportunity for being close to their infants facilitated attainment of their paternal role in the neonatal intensive care unit. Kangaroo Mother Care allowed them to feel in control and that they were doing something good for their infant, although the infant's care could be demanding and stressful. As active agents in their infant's care, some fathers stayed with the infant during the whole hospital stay, others were at the neonatal intensive care unit all day long. Despite the un-wished-for situation, they adapted to their predicament and spent as much time as possible with their infants. Conclusion. Fathers' opportunities for Kangaroo Mother Care helped them to attain their paternal role and to cope with the unexpected situation. The physical environment and conflicting staff statements influenced their opportunity for, and experience of, caring for their preterm infants.</p>},
  author       = {Blomqvist, Ylva Thernström and Rubertsson, Christine and Kylberg, Elisabeth and Jöreskog, Karin and Nyqvist, Kerstin Hedberg},
  issn         = {0309-2402},
  keyword      = {Father,Infant,Kangaroo Mother Care,Neonatal intensive care unit,Nursing},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1988--1996},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Advanced Nursing},
  title        = {Kangaroo mother care helps fathers of preterm infants gain confidence in the paternal role},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2011.05886.x},
  volume       = {68},
  year         = {2012},
}