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Partial and full-thickness neuroretinal transplants

Ghosh, F LU ; Juliusson, B LU ; Arnér, K LU and Ehinger, B LU (1999) In Experimental Eye Research 68(1). p.67-74
Abstract

Adult and embryonic rabbit retinal sheets were transplanted into the subretinal space of adult rabbits. The transplants were either full-thickness with intact layering, or gelatin embedded and vibratome sectioned with the inner retina removed. The full-thickness grafts were positioned subretinally by means of a glass capillary in which they were partially folded. The vibratome sectioned ones were placed using a plastic injector in which the gelatin embedded graft was flat. The embryonic full-thickness grafts were followed clinically up to 3 months, and the other 3 transplant types up to 1 month postoperatively, after which the retina was sectioned and stained for light microscopy. Surgical complications were more common in eyes... (More)

Adult and embryonic rabbit retinal sheets were transplanted into the subretinal space of adult rabbits. The transplants were either full-thickness with intact layering, or gelatin embedded and vibratome sectioned with the inner retina removed. The full-thickness grafts were positioned subretinally by means of a glass capillary in which they were partially folded. The vibratome sectioned ones were placed using a plastic injector in which the gelatin embedded graft was flat. The embryonic full-thickness grafts were followed clinically up to 3 months, and the other 3 transplant types up to 1 month postoperatively, after which the retina was sectioned and stained for light microscopy. Surgical complications were more common in eyes receiving vibratome sectioned grafts with 10 out of 34 eyes displaying blood in the vitreous. Four of these eyes also developed total retinal detachment. Out of 17 eyes receiving full-thickness grafts, only one displayed these complications. Histologically, 11 out of 13 embryonic full-thickness transplants revealed straight, laminated transplants with correct polarity, and with all normal retinal layers present. In these transplants, fusion with the host increased in time. Of the adult full-thickness transplants, only 1 out of 4 survived, and this graft showed signs of degeneration. The vibratome sectioned adult transplants in a few cases survived the first two postoperative weeks. In these grafts, both inner and outer retina were present, indicating an incomplete vibratome sectioning. With longer postoperative times, the number of surviving transplants in this group diminished considerably. All vibratome sectioned embryonic transplants developed into rosettes and sometimes also into laminated sections with reversed polarity. It can be concluded that in rabbits, the surgical technique used for vibratome sectioned transplants requires a larger sclerotomy and retinotomy, since they have to be kept flat in the transplanting instrument due to the surrounding gelatin. This technique is associated with a higher frequency of complications than the one used for full-thickness grafts which are more flexible and can be transplanted with a smaller instrument. Vibratome sectioning of embryonic grafts results in abnormal morphology and their adult counterparts only survive if the sectioning is incomplete. Adult full-thickness grafts show poor survival. Embryonic full-thickness transplants in the majority of cases develop into laminated retinas with layers parallel to the host retinal pigment epithelium. They also survive and integrate well with the host retina.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Animals, Embryonic Structures, Female, Male, Rabbits, Retina, Retinal Detachment, Tissue Transplantation, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
in
Experimental Eye Research
volume
68
issue
1
pages
8 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:0033046190
ISSN
0014-4835
DOI
10.1006/exer.1998.0582
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
89f53396-5546-4ca5-ae70-5db8992497a8
date added to LUP
2017-05-17 11:39:49
date last changed
2017-05-21 05:01:48
@article{89f53396-5546-4ca5-ae70-5db8992497a8,
  abstract     = {<p>Adult and embryonic rabbit retinal sheets were transplanted into the subretinal space of adult rabbits. The transplants were either full-thickness with intact layering, or gelatin embedded and vibratome sectioned with the inner retina removed. The full-thickness grafts were positioned subretinally by means of a glass capillary in which they were partially folded. The vibratome sectioned ones were placed using a plastic injector in which the gelatin embedded graft was flat. The embryonic full-thickness grafts were followed clinically up to 3 months, and the other 3 transplant types up to 1 month postoperatively, after which the retina was sectioned and stained for light microscopy. Surgical complications were more common in eyes receiving vibratome sectioned grafts with 10 out of 34 eyes displaying blood in the vitreous. Four of these eyes also developed total retinal detachment. Out of 17 eyes receiving full-thickness grafts, only one displayed these complications. Histologically, 11 out of 13 embryonic full-thickness transplants revealed straight, laminated transplants with correct polarity, and with all normal retinal layers present. In these transplants, fusion with the host increased in time. Of the adult full-thickness transplants, only 1 out of 4 survived, and this graft showed signs of degeneration. The vibratome sectioned adult transplants in a few cases survived the first two postoperative weeks. In these grafts, both inner and outer retina were present, indicating an incomplete vibratome sectioning. With longer postoperative times, the number of surviving transplants in this group diminished considerably. All vibratome sectioned embryonic transplants developed into rosettes and sometimes also into laminated sections with reversed polarity. It can be concluded that in rabbits, the surgical technique used for vibratome sectioned transplants requires a larger sclerotomy and retinotomy, since they have to be kept flat in the transplanting instrument due to the surrounding gelatin. This technique is associated with a higher frequency of complications than the one used for full-thickness grafts which are more flexible and can be transplanted with a smaller instrument. Vibratome sectioning of embryonic grafts results in abnormal morphology and their adult counterparts only survive if the sectioning is incomplete. Adult full-thickness grafts show poor survival. Embryonic full-thickness transplants in the majority of cases develop into laminated retinas with layers parallel to the host retinal pigment epithelium. They also survive and integrate well with the host retina.</p>},
  author       = {Ghosh, F and Juliusson, B and Arnér, K and Ehinger, B},
  issn         = {0014-4835},
  keyword      = {Animals,Embryonic Structures,Female,Male,Rabbits,Retina,Retinal Detachment,Tissue Transplantation,Journal Article,Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {67--74},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Experimental Eye Research},
  title        = {Partial and full-thickness neuroretinal transplants},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/exer.1998.0582},
  volume       = {68},
  year         = {1999},
}