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Proximal cerebral arteries develop myogenic responsiveness in heart failure via tumor necrosis factor-α-dependent activation of sphingosine-1- phosphate signaling

Yang, Jingli; Hossein Noyan-Ashraf, M.; Meissner, Anja LU ; Voigtlaender-Bolz, Julia; Kroetsch, Jeffrey T.; Foltz, Warren D.; Jaffray, David; Kapoor, Amita; Momen, M. Abdul and Heximer, Scott P., et al. (2012) In Circulation 126(2). p.196-206
Abstract

BACKGROUND - Heart failure is associated with neurological deficits, including cognitive dysfunction. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying reduced cerebral blood flow in the early stages of heart failure, particularly when blood pressure is minimally affected, are not known. METHODS AND RESULTS - Using a myocardial infarction model in mice, we demonstrate a tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-dependent enhancement of posterior cerebral artery tone that reduces cerebral blood flow before any overt changes in brain structure and function. TNFα expression is increased in mouse posterior cerebral artery smooth muscle cells at 6 weeks after myocardial infarction. Coordinately, isolated posterior cerebral arteries display augmented... (More)

BACKGROUND - Heart failure is associated with neurological deficits, including cognitive dysfunction. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying reduced cerebral blood flow in the early stages of heart failure, particularly when blood pressure is minimally affected, are not known. METHODS AND RESULTS - Using a myocardial infarction model in mice, we demonstrate a tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-dependent enhancement of posterior cerebral artery tone that reduces cerebral blood flow before any overt changes in brain structure and function. TNFα expression is increased in mouse posterior cerebral artery smooth muscle cells at 6 weeks after myocardial infarction. Coordinately, isolated posterior cerebral arteries display augmented myogenic tone, which can be fully reversed in vitro by the competitive TNFα antagonist etanercept. TNFα mediates its effect via a sphingosine-1- phosphate (S1P)-dependent mechanism, requiring sphingosine kinase 1 and the S1P2 receptor. In vivo, sphingosine kinase 1 deletion prevents and etanercept (2-week treatment initiated 6 weeks after myocardial infarction) reverses the reduction of cerebral blood flow, without improving cardiac function. CONCLUSIONS - Cerebral artery vasoconstriction and decreased cerebral blood flow occur early in an animal model of heart failure; these perturbations are reversed by interrupting TNFα/S1P signaling. This signaling pathway may represent a potential therapeutic target to improve cognitive function in heart failure.

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publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
cerebrovascular circulation, myocardial infarction, signal transduction, sphingosine kinase, vasomotor system
in
Circulation
volume
126
issue
2
pages
11 pages
publisher
Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
external identifiers
  • scopus:84863795499
ISSN
0009-7322
DOI
10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.039644
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
8a734608-ca86-4aa3-bbc6-1eb119e564a3
date added to LUP
2017-05-23 22:24:37
date last changed
2017-11-19 04:40:20
@article{8a734608-ca86-4aa3-bbc6-1eb119e564a3,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND - Heart failure is associated with neurological deficits, including cognitive dysfunction. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying reduced cerebral blood flow in the early stages of heart failure, particularly when blood pressure is minimally affected, are not known. METHODS AND RESULTS - Using a myocardial infarction model in mice, we demonstrate a tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-dependent enhancement of posterior cerebral artery tone that reduces cerebral blood flow before any overt changes in brain structure and function. TNFα expression is increased in mouse posterior cerebral artery smooth muscle cells at 6 weeks after myocardial infarction. Coordinately, isolated posterior cerebral arteries display augmented myogenic tone, which can be fully reversed in vitro by the competitive TNFα antagonist etanercept. TNFα mediates its effect via a sphingosine-1- phosphate (S1P)-dependent mechanism, requiring sphingosine kinase 1 and the S1P2 receptor. In vivo, sphingosine kinase 1 deletion prevents and etanercept (2-week treatment initiated 6 weeks after myocardial infarction) reverses the reduction of cerebral blood flow, without improving cardiac function. CONCLUSIONS - Cerebral artery vasoconstriction and decreased cerebral blood flow occur early in an animal model of heart failure; these perturbations are reversed by interrupting TNFα/S1P signaling. This signaling pathway may represent a potential therapeutic target to improve cognitive function in heart failure.</p>},
  author       = {Yang, Jingli and Hossein Noyan-Ashraf, M. and Meissner, Anja and Voigtlaender-Bolz, Julia and Kroetsch, Jeffrey T. and Foltz, Warren D. and Jaffray, David and Kapoor, Amita and Momen, M. Abdul and Heximer, Scott P. and Zhang, Hangjun and Van Eede, Matthijs and Henkelman, R. Mark and Matthews, Stephen G. and Lidington, Darcy and Husain, Mansoor and Bolz, Steffen Sebastian},
  issn         = {0009-7322},
  keyword      = {cerebrovascular circulation,myocardial infarction,signal transduction,sphingosine kinase,vasomotor system},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {196--206},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams and Wilkins},
  series       = {Circulation},
  title        = {Proximal cerebral arteries develop myogenic responsiveness in heart failure via tumor necrosis factor-α-dependent activation of sphingosine-1- phosphate signaling},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.111.039644},
  volume       = {126},
  year         = {2012},
}