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Atopic dermatitis, educational attainment and psychological functioning : a national cohort study

Smirnova, J.; von Kobyletzki, L. B. LU ; Lindberg, M.; Svensson, LU ; Langan, S. M. and Montgomery, S. (2018) In British Journal of Dermatology
Abstract

Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) might adversely affect academic performance, possibly through influences on psychological functioning such as stress resilience. Objectives: To investigate the association of atopic dermatitis with stress resilience, cognitive function and educational attainment. Methods: We used data from a national cohort of men who underwent a military conscription examination at ages 17–20 years in Sweden between 1969 and 1976. All potential conscripts met a physician who assessed current or previous history of AD. Stress resilience was measured by a psychologist using a semistructured interview. The conscription assessment included a written cognitive function test. The highest level of education achieved was... (More)

Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) might adversely affect academic performance, possibly through influences on psychological functioning such as stress resilience. Objectives: To investigate the association of atopic dermatitis with stress resilience, cognitive function and educational attainment. Methods: We used data from a national cohort of men who underwent a military conscription examination at ages 17–20 years in Sweden between 1969 and 1976. All potential conscripts met a physician who assessed current or previous history of AD. Stress resilience was measured by a psychologist using a semistructured interview. The conscription assessment included a written cognitive function test. The highest level of education achieved was identified through record linkage. Results: The study population included 234 715 men, 1673 (0·7%) of whom had a diagnosis of AD. AD was associated with a greater risk of low stress resilience [adjusted relative risk ratio (RRR) 1·60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·38–1·86]. AD was associated with higher cognitive function (β-coefficient 0·15, 95% CI 0·05–0·24) and higher educational level (RRR 1·29, 95% CI 1·13–1·47). However, adjustment for socioeconomic characteristics of the family of origin attenuated the magnitude of the associations and eliminated the statistical significance (β-coefficient 0·06, 95% CI −0·03 to 0·15; RRR 1·16, 95% CI 1·00–1·35). Conclusions: Swedish men with AD had lower stress resilience in late adolescence but did not have lower cognitive function or poorer educational attainment. The lower stress resilience associated with AD is consistent with an increased risk of possible long-term adverse health outcomes.

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author
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publication status
epub
subject
in
British Journal of Dermatology
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85058052817
ISSN
0007-0963
DOI
10.1111/bjd.17330
language
English
LU publication?
no
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8d4281dd-f313-4e72-9233-37db7b95eeb6
date added to LUP
2019-01-08 14:12:32
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2019-10-15 06:53:39
@article{8d4281dd-f313-4e72-9233-37db7b95eeb6,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) might adversely affect academic performance, possibly through influences on psychological functioning such as stress resilience. Objectives: To investigate the association of atopic dermatitis with stress resilience, cognitive function and educational attainment. Methods: We used data from a national cohort of men who underwent a military conscription examination at ages 17–20 years in Sweden between 1969 and 1976. All potential conscripts met a physician who assessed current or previous history of AD. Stress resilience was measured by a psychologist using a semistructured interview. The conscription assessment included a written cognitive function test. The highest level of education achieved was identified through record linkage. Results: The study population included 234 715 men, 1673 (0·7%) of whom had a diagnosis of AD. AD was associated with a greater risk of low stress resilience [adjusted relative risk ratio (RRR) 1·60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·38–1·86]. AD was associated with higher cognitive function (β-coefficient 0·15, 95% CI 0·05–0·24) and higher educational level (RRR 1·29, 95% CI 1·13–1·47). However, adjustment for socioeconomic characteristics of the family of origin attenuated the magnitude of the associations and eliminated the statistical significance (β-coefficient 0·06, 95% CI −0·03 to 0·15; RRR 1·16, 95% CI 1·00–1·35). Conclusions: Swedish men with AD had lower stress resilience in late adolescence but did not have lower cognitive function or poorer educational attainment. The lower stress resilience associated with AD is consistent with an increased risk of possible long-term adverse health outcomes.</p>},
  author       = {Smirnova, J. and von Kobyletzki, L. B. and Lindberg, M. and Svensson,  and Langan, S. M. and Montgomery, S.},
  issn         = {0007-0963},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {British Journal of Dermatology},
  title        = {Atopic dermatitis, educational attainment and psychological functioning : a national cohort study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjd.17330},
  year         = {2018},
}