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Autofluorescence guided biopsy for the early diagnosis of bladder carcinoma

Koenig, Frank; McGovern, Francis J.; Enquist, Henrik LU ; Larne, Rickard; Deutsch, Thomas F. and Schomacker, Kevin T. (1998) In Journal of Urology 159(6). p.1871-1875
Abstract (Swedish)
Purpose We validate the usefulness of laser-induced autofluorescence for the detection of bladder carcinoma. Materials and Methods We obtained and analyzed fluorescence spectra from 75 patients in whom bladder cancer was suspected. Tissue fluorescence was excited by a nitrogen laser using a quartz optical fiber placed in gentle contact with the area of interest. The laser-induced autofluorescence spectrum was recorded using an intensified optical multichannel analyzer system. Spectra were corrected for the spectral response of the optical system, and the ratios of laser-induced autofluorescence intensities (I) at 385 and 455 nm. (I385/I455) were determined. We had previously established this ratio as a diagnostic algorithm. We included... (More)
Purpose We validate the usefulness of laser-induced autofluorescence for the detection of bladder carcinoma. Materials and Methods We obtained and analyzed fluorescence spectra from 75 patients in whom bladder cancer was suspected. Tissue fluorescence was excited by a nitrogen laser using a quartz optical fiber placed in gentle contact with the area of interest. The laser-induced autofluorescence spectrum was recorded using an intensified optical multichannel analyzer system. Spectra were corrected for the spectral response of the optical system, and the ratios of laser-induced autofluorescence intensities (I) at 385 and 455 nm. (I385/I455) were determined. We had previously established this ratio as a diagnostic algorithm. We included only suspicious bladder lesions (erythematous, edematous, raised and so forth) that were difficult to diagnose by cystoscopy as well as areas from which random biopsies were obtained. The fluorescence ratio algorithm was applied to 130 bladder areas. Results Of the 130 biopsies obtained during routine cystoscopy 107 (82%) were nonmalignant by histological classification. In contrast, because laser-induced autofluorescence effectively guides biopsies towards malignant lesions, only 30 biopsies (72% fewer) would have been obtained from nonmalignant tissue if the fluorescence ratio that identifies 95% of malignant lesions (95th percentile) had been selected as the decision criterion during standard cystoscopy. Conclusions By guiding the surgeon to suspicious lesions that are most likely to be malignant, laser-induced autofluorescence substantially decreases the number of biopsies obtained from nonmalignant tissue during cystoscopy to diagnose bladder carcinoma. (Less)
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author
publishing date
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Urology
volume
159
issue
6
pages
5 pages
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • scopus:0032413239
ISSN
0022-5347
DOI
10.1016/S0022-5347(01)63183-5
language
English
LU publication?
no
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8f14c727-58af-4f51-afd4-d404b763ef26
date added to LUP
2017-04-12 09:45:00
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2017-04-27 10:52:19
@article{8f14c727-58af-4f51-afd4-d404b763ef26,
  abstract     = {Purpose We validate the usefulness of laser-induced autofluorescence for the detection of bladder carcinoma. Materials and Methods We obtained and analyzed fluorescence spectra from 75 patients in whom bladder cancer was suspected. Tissue fluorescence was excited by a nitrogen laser using a quartz optical fiber placed in gentle contact with the area of interest. The laser-induced autofluorescence spectrum was recorded using an intensified optical multichannel analyzer system. Spectra were corrected for the spectral response of the optical system, and the ratios of laser-induced autofluorescence intensities (I) at 385 and 455 nm. (I385/I455) were determined. We had previously established this ratio as a diagnostic algorithm. We included only suspicious bladder lesions (erythematous, edematous, raised and so forth) that were difficult to diagnose by cystoscopy as well as areas from which random biopsies were obtained. The fluorescence ratio algorithm was applied to 130 bladder areas. Results Of the 130 biopsies obtained during routine cystoscopy 107 (82%) were nonmalignant by histological classification. In contrast, because laser-induced autofluorescence effectively guides biopsies towards malignant lesions, only 30 biopsies (72% fewer) would have been obtained from nonmalignant tissue if the fluorescence ratio that identifies 95% of malignant lesions (95th percentile) had been selected as the decision criterion during standard cystoscopy. Conclusions By guiding the surgeon to suspicious lesions that are most likely to be malignant, laser-induced autofluorescence substantially decreases the number of biopsies obtained from nonmalignant tissue during cystoscopy to diagnose bladder carcinoma.},
  author       = {Koenig, Frank and McGovern, Francis J. and Enquist, Henrik and Larne, Rickard and Deutsch, Thomas F. and Schomacker, Kevin T.},
  issn         = {0022-5347},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {1871--1875},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Journal of Urology},
  title        = {Autofluorescence guided biopsy for the early diagnosis of bladder carcinoma},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0022-5347(01)63183-5},
  volume       = {159},
  year         = {1998},
}