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The core of sibling stem cell donation-A grounded theory study

Kisch, Annika M. and Forsberg, Anna LU (2017) In Open Nursing Journal 11. p.73-83
Abstract

Background: There is a lack of theoretical framework supporting stem cell transplant nurses in their assessment, judgment and caring interventions of sibling stem cell donors. Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore sibling stem cell donors’ main concerns and how they deal with them before and after donation. Method: Ten healthy sibling donors, 5 men and 5 women, with a median age of 54 years were included in this study when they were due to donate stem cells to a brother or sister. Data were collected prospectively on three occasions (before the donation and three and twelve months after it) through in-depth interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis by the Grounded Theory method according to... (More)

Background: There is a lack of theoretical framework supporting stem cell transplant nurses in their assessment, judgment and caring interventions of sibling stem cell donors. Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore sibling stem cell donors’ main concerns and how they deal with them before and after donation. Method: Ten healthy sibling donors, 5 men and 5 women, with a median age of 54 years were included in this study when they were due to donate stem cells to a brother or sister. Data were collected prospectively on three occasions (before the donation and three and twelve months after it) through in-depth interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis by the Grounded Theory method according to Charmaz. Results: This study describes the efforts of the ten donors to fulfil their duty as a sibling by doing what they considered necessary in order to help. Their efforts were summarised in a process wherein the grounded theory generated three main categories; Prepare, Promote and Preserve. A clear path of transition leading to fulfilment is evident, starting before the donation and continuing for one year afterwards. Conclusions: Being a sibling stem cell donor means doing what you have to do to fulfil your duty and if possible, saving the life of a seriously ill brother or sister. The relationship between the siblings is strengthened by the donation process. Sibling stem cell donation appears to be about fulfilment and the theoretical framework may support clinicians in their evaluation and support of donors.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Charmaz, Grounded theory, Interviews, Qualitative study, Sibling, Stem cell donation, Transition
in
Open Nursing Journal
volume
11
pages
11 pages
publisher
Bentham Science Publishers
external identifiers
  • scopus:85027160515
ISSN
1874-4346
DOI
10.2174/1874434601711010073
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8f5afdd6-2e14-4ef4-96cb-5c36a054b52b
date added to LUP
2017-09-04 13:44:27
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:17:32
@article{8f5afdd6-2e14-4ef4-96cb-5c36a054b52b,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: There is a lack of theoretical framework supporting stem cell transplant nurses in their assessment, judgment and caring interventions of sibling stem cell donors. Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore sibling stem cell donors’ main concerns and how they deal with them before and after donation. Method: Ten healthy sibling donors, 5 men and 5 women, with a median age of 54 years were included in this study when they were due to donate stem cells to a brother or sister. Data were collected prospectively on three occasions (before the donation and three and twelve months after it) through in-depth interviews, which were recorded and transcribed verbatim for analysis by the Grounded Theory method according to Charmaz. Results: This study describes the efforts of the ten donors to fulfil their duty as a sibling by doing what they considered necessary in order to help. Their efforts were summarised in a process wherein the grounded theory generated three main categories; Prepare, Promote and Preserve. A clear path of transition leading to fulfilment is evident, starting before the donation and continuing for one year afterwards. Conclusions: Being a sibling stem cell donor means doing what you have to do to fulfil your duty and if possible, saving the life of a seriously ill brother or sister. The relationship between the siblings is strengthened by the donation process. Sibling stem cell donation appears to be about fulfilment and the theoretical framework may support clinicians in their evaluation and support of donors.</p>},
  author       = {Kisch, Annika M. and Forsberg, Anna},
  issn         = {1874-4346},
  keyword      = {Charmaz,Grounded theory,Interviews,Qualitative study,Sibling,Stem cell donation,Transition},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  pages        = {73--83},
  publisher    = {Bentham Science Publishers},
  series       = {Open Nursing Journal},
  title        = {The core of sibling stem cell donation-A grounded theory study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1874434601711010073},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2017},
}