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Responding to Other People's Direct Gaze : Alterations in Gaze Behavior in Infants at Risk for Autism Occur on Very Short Timescales

Nyström, Pär; Falck-Ytter, Terje; Bolte, Sven and , (2017) In Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 47(11). p.3498-3509
Abstract

Atypical gaze processing has been reported in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Here we explored how infants at risk for ASD respond behaviorally to others' direct gaze. We assessed 10-month-olds with a sibling with ASD (high risk group; n = 61) and a control group (n = 18) during interaction with an adult. Eye-tracking revealed less looking at the adult in the high risk group during 300-1000 ms after the adult initiated direct gaze: a short alteration that is likely to go unnoticed by the naked eye. Data aggregated over longer segments (the traditional eye-tracking approach) showed no group differences. Although findings are limited by lack of outcome data, they are in line with theories linking atypical eye processing to... (More)

Atypical gaze processing has been reported in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Here we explored how infants at risk for ASD respond behaviorally to others' direct gaze. We assessed 10-month-olds with a sibling with ASD (high risk group; n = 61) and a control group (n = 18) during interaction with an adult. Eye-tracking revealed less looking at the adult in the high risk group during 300-1000 ms after the adult initiated direct gaze: a short alteration that is likely to go unnoticed by the naked eye. Data aggregated over longer segments (the traditional eye-tracking approach) showed no group differences. Although findings are limited by lack of outcome data, they are in line with theories linking atypical eye processing to the emergence of ASD.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adult, Autism Spectrum Disorder/diagnosis, Child, Eye Movements, Female, Humans, Infant, Male, Nonverbal Communication
in
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
volume
47
issue
11
pages
12 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85028864247
ISSN
0162-3257
DOI
10.1007/s10803-017-3253-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8fbff209-4fc0-428d-8526-59a52cb6e8f8
date added to LUP
2019-05-29 22:16:52
date last changed
2019-10-15 07:07:02
@article{8fbff209-4fc0-428d-8526-59a52cb6e8f8,
  abstract     = {<p>Atypical gaze processing has been reported in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Here we explored how infants at risk for ASD respond behaviorally to others' direct gaze. We assessed 10-month-olds with a sibling with ASD (high risk group; n = 61) and a control group (n = 18) during interaction with an adult. Eye-tracking revealed less looking at the adult in the high risk group during 300-1000 ms after the adult initiated direct gaze: a short alteration that is likely to go unnoticed by the naked eye. Data aggregated over longer segments (the traditional eye-tracking approach) showed no group differences. Although findings are limited by lack of outcome data, they are in line with theories linking atypical eye processing to the emergence of ASD.</p>},
  author       = {Nyström, Pär and Falck-Ytter, Terje and Bolte, Sven and , },
  issn         = {0162-3257},
  keyword      = {Adult,Autism Spectrum Disorder/diagnosis,Child,Eye Movements,Female,Humans,Infant,Male,Nonverbal Communication},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {3498--3509},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders},
  title        = {Responding to Other People's Direct Gaze : Alterations in Gaze Behavior in Infants at Risk for Autism Occur on Very Short Timescales},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10803-017-3253-7},
  volume       = {47},
  year         = {2017},
}