Advanced

Evolution of free, complexed, and total serum prostate-specific antigen and their ratios during 1 year of follow-up of men with febrile urinary tract infection

Zackrisson, B; Ulleryd, P; Aus, G; Lilja, Hans LU ; Sandberg, T and Hugosson, J (2003) In Urology 62(2). p.278-281
Abstract
Objectives. To determine the serum values of free, complexed, and total prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and their ratios in men with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) during 1 year of follow-up. Methods. A total of 54 men were prospectively enrolled in the study, and serum samples were obtained at the acute stage of the UTI and after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Most men had a rise (median 3.1, 7.2, and 14.1 ng/mL, respectively) in free PSA (fPSA), complexed PSA (cPSA), and total PSA (tPSA) during the acute phase of the UTI. After 1 month, fPSA rapidly decreased to levels that were maintained during the rest of the follow-up period, and cPSA and tPSA declined more slowly. At 1, 3, and 6 months after the infection the fPSA/tPSA and... (More)
Objectives. To determine the serum values of free, complexed, and total prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and their ratios in men with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) during 1 year of follow-up. Methods. A total of 54 men were prospectively enrolled in the study, and serum samples were obtained at the acute stage of the UTI and after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Most men had a rise (median 3.1, 7.2, and 14.1 ng/mL, respectively) in free PSA (fPSA), complexed PSA (cPSA), and total PSA (tPSA) during the acute phase of the UTI. After 1 month, fPSA rapidly decreased to levels that were maintained during the rest of the follow-up period, and cPSA and tPSA declined more slowly. At 1, 3, and 6 months after the infection the fPSA/tPSA and fPSA/cPSA ratios were abnormal in one half to two thirds of the men (median ratio 11%, 15%, and 16% and 17%, 24%, and 24%, respectively), comparable to findings in patients with prostate cancer. Conclusions. These results confirmed that the prostate is involved in men with febrile UTI. The low fPSA/tPSA and fPSA/cPSA ratios in combination with sustained elevations of cPSA and tPSA for up to 6 months after UTI could be falsely interpreted as a sign of prostate cancer. The prolonged elevation of cPSA indicates a long-lasting inflammation of the nonadenomatous parts of the prostate. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Urology
volume
62
issue
2
pages
278 - 281
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000184557200017
  • pmid:12893335
  • scopus:0042123586
ISSN
1527-9995
DOI
10.1016/S0090-4295(03)00372-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3eb5b683-6ec8-48d3-ba0f-09cf10611082 (old id 900052)
date added to LUP
2008-01-16 11:59:31
date last changed
2018-02-11 03:23:05
@article{3eb5b683-6ec8-48d3-ba0f-09cf10611082,
  abstract     = {Objectives. To determine the serum values of free, complexed, and total prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and their ratios in men with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) during 1 year of follow-up. Methods. A total of 54 men were prospectively enrolled in the study, and serum samples were obtained at the acute stage of the UTI and after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Most men had a rise (median 3.1, 7.2, and 14.1 ng/mL, respectively) in free PSA (fPSA), complexed PSA (cPSA), and total PSA (tPSA) during the acute phase of the UTI. After 1 month, fPSA rapidly decreased to levels that were maintained during the rest of the follow-up period, and cPSA and tPSA declined more slowly. At 1, 3, and 6 months after the infection the fPSA/tPSA and fPSA/cPSA ratios were abnormal in one half to two thirds of the men (median ratio 11%, 15%, and 16% and 17%, 24%, and 24%, respectively), comparable to findings in patients with prostate cancer. Conclusions. These results confirmed that the prostate is involved in men with febrile UTI. The low fPSA/tPSA and fPSA/cPSA ratios in combination with sustained elevations of cPSA and tPSA for up to 6 months after UTI could be falsely interpreted as a sign of prostate cancer. The prolonged elevation of cPSA indicates a long-lasting inflammation of the nonadenomatous parts of the prostate.},
  author       = {Zackrisson, B and Ulleryd, P and Aus, G and Lilja, Hans and Sandberg, T and Hugosson, J},
  issn         = {1527-9995},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {278--281},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Urology},
  title        = {Evolution of free, complexed, and total serum prostate-specific antigen and their ratios during 1 year of follow-up of men with febrile urinary tract infection},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0090-4295(03)00372-8},
  volume       = {62},
  year         = {2003},
}