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Gender differences in secondary prevention of coronary heart disease: reasons to worry or not?

Nilsson, P; Brandstrom, H; Lingfors, H; Erhardt, Leif RW LU ; Hedback, B; Israelsson, Bo LU and Sjoberg, G (2003) In Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care 21(1). p.37-42
Abstract
Objective - To analyse potential gender differences in cardiovascular risk factors and treatment patterns, reflecting clinical practice in secondary prevention. Design - Observational national study during 3 years of patients eligible for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). Setting - Fifty-two healthcare districts in Sweden, involving primary health care and hospitals in collaboration, participating in a national quality assurance programme for the prevention of CHD. Subjects - A national sample of male and female patients surviving acute myocardial infarction, or following CABG/PTCA interventions for CHD, controlled at 3-6 months (n=9135) and 12 months (n=4802) of follow-up. The proportion of female patients (25%) did... (More)
Objective - To analyse potential gender differences in cardiovascular risk factors and treatment patterns, reflecting clinical practice in secondary prevention. Design - Observational national study during 3 years of patients eligible for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). Setting - Fifty-two healthcare districts in Sweden, involving primary health care and hospitals in collaboration, participating in a national quality assurance programme for the prevention of CHD. Subjects - A national sample of male and female patients surviving acute myocardial infarction, or following CABG/PTCA interventions for CHD, controlled at 3-6 months (n=9135) and 12 months (n=4802) of follow-up. The proportion of female patients (25%) did not differ between visits. Main outcome measures - Self-reported data on lifestyle, drug treatment and cardiovascular risk factor levels after consultation in general practice or at hospital policlinics. Results - No major gender differences were recorded in risk factor levels or in cardiovascular drug treatment patterns at 12 months of follow-up. Female patients participated in educational programmes to improve lifestyle to a higher degree than males (52.0 vs 45.1%), but after 1 year were more often (p < 0.001) self-reported smokers (11.7 vs 8.4%). Female patients showed higher levels of blood pressure, total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol, but not LDL cholesterol compared to male patients. Conclusions - In general, a gender-equal level of lipid control and access to medical drug treatment has been established for patients in secondary prevention from a national sample in Sweden, followed for 1 year after CHD manifestations and related interventions. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
secondary prevention, risk, lipids, lifestyle, coronary heart disease, hypertension
in
Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care
volume
21
issue
1
pages
37 - 42
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000182268500009
  • pmid:12718459
  • scopus:0037356566
ISSN
0281-3432
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9d223d13-4fc6-424a-8a4f-31d0e2a50d79 (old id 900475)
date added to LUP
2008-01-15 09:18:27
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:57:23
@article{9d223d13-4fc6-424a-8a4f-31d0e2a50d79,
  abstract     = {Objective - To analyse potential gender differences in cardiovascular risk factors and treatment patterns, reflecting clinical practice in secondary prevention. Design - Observational national study during 3 years of patients eligible for secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD). Setting - Fifty-two healthcare districts in Sweden, involving primary health care and hospitals in collaboration, participating in a national quality assurance programme for the prevention of CHD. Subjects - A national sample of male and female patients surviving acute myocardial infarction, or following CABG/PTCA interventions for CHD, controlled at 3-6 months (n=9135) and 12 months (n=4802) of follow-up. The proportion of female patients (25%) did not differ between visits. Main outcome measures - Self-reported data on lifestyle, drug treatment and cardiovascular risk factor levels after consultation in general practice or at hospital policlinics. Results - No major gender differences were recorded in risk factor levels or in cardiovascular drug treatment patterns at 12 months of follow-up. Female patients participated in educational programmes to improve lifestyle to a higher degree than males (52.0 vs 45.1%), but after 1 year were more often (p &lt; 0.001) self-reported smokers (11.7 vs 8.4%). Female patients showed higher levels of blood pressure, total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol, but not LDL cholesterol compared to male patients. Conclusions - In general, a gender-equal level of lipid control and access to medical drug treatment has been established for patients in secondary prevention from a national sample in Sweden, followed for 1 year after CHD manifestations and related interventions.},
  author       = {Nilsson, P and Brandstrom, H and Lingfors, H and Erhardt, Leif RW and Hedback, B and Israelsson, Bo and Sjoberg, G},
  issn         = {0281-3432},
  keyword      = {secondary prevention,risk,lipids,lifestyle,coronary heart disease,hypertension},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {37--42},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care},
  title        = {Gender differences in secondary prevention of coronary heart disease: reasons to worry or not?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2003},
}