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Heparin-binding protein as a biomarker of post-injury sepsis in trauma patients

Halldorsdottir, H. D.; Eriksson, J.; Persson, B. P.; Herwald, H. LU ; Lindbom, L.; Weitzberg, E. and Oldner, A. (2018) In Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 62(7). p.962-973
Abstract

Background: Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is a neutrophil-derived protein advocated as a biomarker in sepsis. We evaluated plasma HBP as a predictor of post-injury sepsis in trauma patients. Methods: Ninety-seven trauma patients were studied during the first week of intensive care. Injury-related data were collected and clinical parameters registered daily. Plasma HBP was sampled on day 1, 3 and 5 after trauma and evaluated for associations with injury-related parameters and sepsis. The predictive properties of HBP were compared to C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell count (WBC). Results: Median Injury Severity Score was 33, one-third of the trauma patients received massive transfusion and a quarter was in shock on arrival.... (More)

Background: Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is a neutrophil-derived protein advocated as a biomarker in sepsis. We evaluated plasma HBP as a predictor of post-injury sepsis in trauma patients. Methods: Ninety-seven trauma patients were studied during the first week of intensive care. Injury-related data were collected and clinical parameters registered daily. Plasma HBP was sampled on day 1, 3 and 5 after trauma and evaluated for associations with injury-related parameters and sepsis. The predictive properties of HBP were compared to C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell count (WBC). Results: Median Injury Severity Score was 33, one-third of the trauma patients received massive transfusion and a quarter was in shock on arrival. Overall 30-day mortality was 8%. Plasma HBP was significantly higher in severely injured patients and associated with shock on arrival, massive transfusions and organ failure. Septic patients had higher levels of HBP only on day 5. When evaluated for prediction of onset of sepsis during the two following days after plasma sampling by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, areas under the curves were non-significant for all time points. Similar patterns were seen for CRP and WBC. Conclusion: In trauma patients, HBP levels are related to severity of injury and organ dysfunction. Heparin-binding protein was weakly associated with sepsis and only at the later stage of the observation period of 1 week. Moreover, HBP showed poor discriminatory properties as an early biomarker of post-injury sepsis. Trauma-induced inflammation during the post-injury phase may blunt the sepsis-predictive performance of HBP.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
volume
62
issue
7
pages
962 - 973
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85044210759
ISSN
0001-5172
DOI
10.1111/aas.13107
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
90303bdf-5c16-406c-b0f4-3480332fa0fa
date added to LUP
2018-04-09 13:35:50
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:13:16
@article{90303bdf-5c16-406c-b0f4-3480332fa0fa,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Heparin-binding protein (HBP) is a neutrophil-derived protein advocated as a biomarker in sepsis. We evaluated plasma HBP as a predictor of post-injury sepsis in trauma patients. Methods: Ninety-seven trauma patients were studied during the first week of intensive care. Injury-related data were collected and clinical parameters registered daily. Plasma HBP was sampled on day 1, 3 and 5 after trauma and evaluated for associations with injury-related parameters and sepsis. The predictive properties of HBP were compared to C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell count (WBC). Results: Median Injury Severity Score was 33, one-third of the trauma patients received massive transfusion and a quarter was in shock on arrival. Overall 30-day mortality was 8%. Plasma HBP was significantly higher in severely injured patients and associated with shock on arrival, massive transfusions and organ failure. Septic patients had higher levels of HBP only on day 5. When evaluated for prediction of onset of sepsis during the two following days after plasma sampling by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, areas under the curves were non-significant for all time points. Similar patterns were seen for CRP and WBC. Conclusion: In trauma patients, HBP levels are related to severity of injury and organ dysfunction. Heparin-binding protein was weakly associated with sepsis and only at the later stage of the observation period of 1 week. Moreover, HBP showed poor discriminatory properties as an early biomarker of post-injury sepsis. Trauma-induced inflammation during the post-injury phase may blunt the sepsis-predictive performance of HBP.</p>},
  author       = {Halldorsdottir, H. D. and Eriksson, J. and Persson, B. P. and Herwald, H. and Lindbom, L. and Weitzberg, E. and Oldner, A.},
  issn         = {0001-5172},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {962--973},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Heparin-binding protein as a biomarker of post-injury sepsis in trauma patients},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aas.13107},
  volume       = {62},
  year         = {2018},
}