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Sensitivity of a Greenland ice sheet model to atmospheric forcing fields

Quiquet, A. ; Punge, H. J. ; Ritz, C. LU ; Fettweis, X. ; Gallée, H. ; Kageyama, M. ; Krinner, G. ; Salas Y Mélia, D. and Sjolte, J. LU (2012) In The Cryosphere 6(5). p.999-1018
Abstract
Predicting the climate for the future and how it will impact ice sheet evolution requires coupling ice sheet models with climate models. However, before we attempt to develop a realistic coupled setup, we propose, in this study, to first analyse the impact of a model simulated climate on an ice sheet. We undertake this exercise for a set of regional and global climate models. Modelled near surface air temperature and precipitation are provided as upper boundary conditions to the GRISLI (GRenoble Ice Shelf and Land Ice model) hybrid ice sheet model (ISM) in its Greenland configuration. After 20 kyrs of simulation, the resulting ice sheets highlight the differences between the climate models. While modelled ice sheet sizes are generally... (More)
Predicting the climate for the future and how it will impact ice sheet evolution requires coupling ice sheet models with climate models. However, before we attempt to develop a realistic coupled setup, we propose, in this study, to first analyse the impact of a model simulated climate on an ice sheet. We undertake this exercise for a set of regional and global climate models. Modelled near surface air temperature and precipitation are provided as upper boundary conditions to the GRISLI (GRenoble Ice Shelf and Land Ice model) hybrid ice sheet model (ISM) in its Greenland configuration. After 20 kyrs of simulation, the resulting ice sheets highlight the differences between the climate models. While modelled ice sheet sizes are generally comparable to the observed one, there are considerable deviations among the ice sheets on regional scales. These deviations can be explained by biases in temperature and precipitation near the coast. This is especially true in the case of global models. But the deviations between the climate models are also due to the differences in the atmospheric general circulation. To account for these differences in the context of coupling ice sheet models with climate models, we conclude that appropriate downscaling methods will be needed. In some cases, systematic corrections of the climatic variables at the interface may be required to obtain realistic results for the Greenland ice sheet (GIS) (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Cryosphere
volume
6
issue
5
pages
999 - 1018
publisher
Copernicus Gesellschaft mbH
external identifiers
  • scopus:84867444663
ISSN
1994-0424
DOI
10.5194/tc-6-999-2012
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
91ef4935-1711-4b2e-9c67-eaeda7ff93e6
date added to LUP
2019-06-19 10:36:32
date last changed
2020-03-11 08:07:37
@article{91ef4935-1711-4b2e-9c67-eaeda7ff93e6,
  abstract     = { Predicting the climate for the future and how it will impact ice sheet evolution requires coupling ice sheet models with climate models. However, before we attempt to develop a realistic coupled setup, we propose, in this study, to first analyse the impact of a model simulated climate on an ice sheet. We undertake this exercise for a set of regional and global climate models. Modelled near surface air temperature and precipitation are provided as upper boundary conditions to the GRISLI (GRenoble Ice Shelf and Land Ice model) hybrid ice sheet model (ISM) in its Greenland configuration. After 20 kyrs of simulation, the resulting ice sheets highlight the differences between the climate models. While modelled ice sheet sizes are generally comparable to the observed one, there are considerable deviations among the ice sheets on regional scales. These deviations can be explained by biases in temperature and precipitation near the coast. This is especially true in the case of global models. But the deviations between the climate models are also due to the differences in the atmospheric general circulation. To account for these differences in the context of coupling ice sheet models with climate models, we conclude that appropriate downscaling methods will be needed. In some cases, systematic corrections of the climatic variables at the interface may be required to obtain realistic results for the Greenland ice sheet (GIS)},
  author       = {Quiquet, A. and Punge, H. J. and Ritz, C. and Fettweis, X. and Gallée, H. and Kageyama, M. and Krinner, G. and Salas Y Mélia, D. and Sjolte, J.},
  issn         = {1994-0424},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {999--1018},
  publisher    = {Copernicus Gesellschaft mbH},
  series       = {The Cryosphere},
  title        = {Sensitivity of a Greenland ice sheet model to atmospheric forcing fields},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/tc-6-999-2012},
  doi          = {10.5194/tc-6-999-2012},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2012},
}