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No strong relationship between body mass index and clinical hand osteoarthritis : results from a population-based case-control study

Magnusson, K LU ; Østerås, N ; Haugen, I K ; Mowinckel, P ; Nordsletten, L ; Natvig, B and Hagen, K B (2014) In Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology 43(5). p.15-409
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this population-based case-control study was to investigate whether a high body mass index (BMI) is a risk factor for clinical hand osteoarthritis (OA).

METHOD: Persons living in Ullensaker municipality in Norway who were aged 20-52 years in 1990 reported height and weight in 1990, 1994, 2004, and 2010 (n = 1276). Cases (clinical hand OA in 2010, n = 59) were compared to controls (participants without self-reported OA or hand pain in 2010, n = 805) with regard to the prospectively measured BMI by means of a generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis adjusted for age, sex, time, and education.

RESULTS: The mean age of hand OA cases was 64 (SD = 7.5) years in 2010 and 78% were women. There was no... (More)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this population-based case-control study was to investigate whether a high body mass index (BMI) is a risk factor for clinical hand osteoarthritis (OA).

METHOD: Persons living in Ullensaker municipality in Norway who were aged 20-52 years in 1990 reported height and weight in 1990, 1994, 2004, and 2010 (n = 1276). Cases (clinical hand OA in 2010, n = 59) were compared to controls (participants without self-reported OA or hand pain in 2010, n = 805) with regard to the prospectively measured BMI by means of a generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis adjusted for age, sex, time, and education.

RESULTS: The mean age of hand OA cases was 64 (SD = 7.5) years in 2010 and 78% were women. There was no association between total average BMI over the entire period and later clinical hand OA (p = 0.320). Cases had a higher mean BMI in 1990 [unstandardized B = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07-1.79] and in 1994 (B = 0.75, 95% CI 0.22-1.28) but there were no differences between the groups in 2004 or 2010.

CONCLUSIONS: The study lend support to the hypothesis that having a higher BMI when young or middle-aged might be associated with later hand OA.

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author
; ; ; ; ; and
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Body Mass Index, Case-Control Studies, Female, Hand Joints/physiopathology, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Models, Statistical, Norway, Obesity/complications, Osteoarthritis/epidemiology, Prospective Studies, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires
in
Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology
volume
43
issue
5
pages
7 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:24824945
  • scopus:84921814382
ISSN
1502-7732
DOI
10.3109/03009742.2014.900700
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
91f9dfbd-0097-4e36-87f8-7f62ac04988b
date added to LUP
2018-11-29 15:12:36
date last changed
2021-05-25 03:54:59
@article{91f9dfbd-0097-4e36-87f8-7f62ac04988b,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVES: The aim of this population-based case-control study was to investigate whether a high body mass index (BMI) is a risk factor for clinical hand osteoarthritis (OA).</p><p>METHOD: Persons living in Ullensaker municipality in Norway who were aged 20-52 years in 1990 reported height and weight in 1990, 1994, 2004, and 2010 (n = 1276). Cases (clinical hand OA in 2010, n = 59) were compared to controls (participants without self-reported OA or hand pain in 2010, n = 805) with regard to the prospectively measured BMI by means of a generalized estimating equation (GEE) analysis adjusted for age, sex, time, and education.</p><p>RESULTS: The mean age of hand OA cases was 64 (SD = 7.5) years in 2010 and 78% were women. There was no association between total average BMI over the entire period and later clinical hand OA (p = 0.320). Cases had a higher mean BMI in 1990 [unstandardized B = 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07-1.79] and in 1994 (B = 0.75, 95% CI 0.22-1.28) but there were no differences between the groups in 2004 or 2010.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: The study lend support to the hypothesis that having a higher BMI when young or middle-aged might be associated with later hand OA.</p>},
  author       = {Magnusson, K and Østerås, N and Haugen, I K and Mowinckel, P and Nordsletten, L and Natvig, B and Hagen, K B},
  issn         = {1502-7732},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {15--409},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology},
  title        = {No strong relationship between body mass index and clinical hand osteoarthritis : results from a population-based case-control study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/03009742.2014.900700},
  doi          = {10.3109/03009742.2014.900700},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2014},
}