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A review of invasive and non-invasive sensory feedback in upper limb prostheses

Svensson, Pamela LU ; Wijk, Ulrika LU ; Björkman, Anders LU and Antfolk, Christian LU (2017) In Expert Review of Medical Devices 14(6). p.439-447
Abstract

Introduction: The constant challenge to restore sensory feedback in prosthetic hands has provided several research solutions, but virtually none has reached clinical fruition. A prosthetic hand with sensory feedback that closely imitates an intact hand and provides a natural feeling may induce the prosthetic hand to be included in the body image and also reinforces the control of the prosthesis. Areas covered: This review presents non-invasive sensory feedback systems such as mechanotactile, vibrotactile, electrotactile and combinational systems which combine the modalities; multi-haptic feedback. Invasive sensory feedback has been tried less, because of the inherent risk, but it has successfully shown to restore some afferent channels.... (More)

Introduction: The constant challenge to restore sensory feedback in prosthetic hands has provided several research solutions, but virtually none has reached clinical fruition. A prosthetic hand with sensory feedback that closely imitates an intact hand and provides a natural feeling may induce the prosthetic hand to be included in the body image and also reinforces the control of the prosthesis. Areas covered: This review presents non-invasive sensory feedback systems such as mechanotactile, vibrotactile, electrotactile and combinational systems which combine the modalities; multi-haptic feedback. Invasive sensory feedback has been tried less, because of the inherent risk, but it has successfully shown to restore some afferent channels. In this review, invasive methods are also discussed, both extraneural and intraneural electrodes, such as cuff electrodes and transverse intrafascicular multichannel electrodes. The focus of the review is on non-invasive methods of providing sensory feedback to upper-limb amputees. Expert commentary: Invoking embodiment has shown to be of importance for the control of prosthesis and acceptance by the prosthetic wearers. It is a challenge to provide conscious feedback to cover the lost sensibility of a hand, not be overwhelming and confusing for the user, and to integrate technology within the constraint of a wearable prosthesis.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
closed loop control, non-invasive feedback, peripheral nerve stimulation, sensory feedback, targeted sensory reinnervation, Upper limb prosthetics
in
Expert Review of Medical Devices
volume
14
issue
6
pages
439 - 447
publisher
Expert Reviews
external identifiers
  • scopus:85020087539
  • wos:000402604700004
ISSN
1743-4440
DOI
10.1080/17434440.2017.1332989
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
936a39db-1147-477f-bec7-881bd72320df
date added to LUP
2017-06-19 10:05:22
date last changed
2018-05-29 12:29:59
@article{936a39db-1147-477f-bec7-881bd72320df,
  abstract     = {<p>Introduction: The constant challenge to restore sensory feedback in prosthetic hands has provided several research solutions, but virtually none has reached clinical fruition. A prosthetic hand with sensory feedback that closely imitates an intact hand and provides a natural feeling may induce the prosthetic hand to be included in the body image and also reinforces the control of the prosthesis. Areas covered: This review presents non-invasive sensory feedback systems such as mechanotactile, vibrotactile, electrotactile and combinational systems which combine the modalities; multi-haptic feedback. Invasive sensory feedback has been tried less, because of the inherent risk, but it has successfully shown to restore some afferent channels. In this review, invasive methods are also discussed, both extraneural and intraneural electrodes, such as cuff electrodes and transverse intrafascicular multichannel electrodes. The focus of the review is on non-invasive methods of providing sensory feedback to upper-limb amputees. Expert commentary: Invoking embodiment has shown to be of importance for the control of prosthesis and acceptance by the prosthetic wearers. It is a challenge to provide conscious feedback to cover the lost sensibility of a hand, not be overwhelming and confusing for the user, and to integrate technology within the constraint of a wearable prosthesis.</p>},
  author       = {Svensson, Pamela and Wijk, Ulrika and Björkman, Anders and Antfolk, Christian},
  issn         = {1743-4440},
  keyword      = {closed loop control,non-invasive feedback,peripheral nerve stimulation,sensory feedback,targeted sensory reinnervation,Upper limb prosthetics},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {439--447},
  publisher    = {Expert Reviews},
  series       = {Expert Review of Medical Devices},
  title        = {A review of invasive and non-invasive sensory feedback in upper limb prostheses},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17434440.2017.1332989},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2017},
}