Advanced

Isolation barriers and genetic divergence in non-territorial Argia damselflies

Nava-Bolaños, Angela LU ; Sánchez-Guillén, Rosa A. LU ; Munguía-Steyer, Roberto and Córdoba-Aguilar, Alex (2016) In Biological Journal of the Linnean Society
Abstract

Isolation barriers work at different instances during the mating process in odonate insects. In territorial damselflies, heterospecific interactions are mainly precluded by sexual (visual) isolation, while in non-territorial damselflies, heterospecific interactions are mostly precluded by mechanical isolation and sexual (tactile) isolation. In this study we investigated the strength of three premating barriers (visual, mechanical and tactile), genetic divergence and degree of sympatry (on their entire distribution) between four non-territorial Argia damselflies (A. anceps, A. extranea, A. oenea and A. tezpi). Our results are explained in the light of learned mating preferences and Kaneshiro's hypothesis. We detected a strong... (More)

Isolation barriers work at different instances during the mating process in odonate insects. In territorial damselflies, heterospecific interactions are mainly precluded by sexual (visual) isolation, while in non-territorial damselflies, heterospecific interactions are mostly precluded by mechanical isolation and sexual (tactile) isolation. In this study we investigated the strength of three premating barriers (visual, mechanical and tactile), genetic divergence and degree of sympatry (on their entire distribution) between four non-territorial Argia damselflies (A. anceps, A. extranea, A. oenea and A. tezpi). Our results are explained in the light of learned mating preferences and Kaneshiro's hypothesis. We detected a strong reproductive isolation between all pairs of species by the joint action of the three studied barriers [visual (90.6%), mechanical (8.7%) and tactile (0.7%)]. Sexual (visual) isolation was the most important barrier, perhaps driven by learning mating preferences. One of the studied species, A. extranea, which is the most derived of the studied species, showed a highly asymmetric isolation in reciprocal crosses, which is consistent with Kaneshiro's hypothesis. Moreover, we detected a negligible ecological niche differentiation between the studied species (70% of shared distribution). Our results suggest that sexual (visual) selection may be an important force driving speciation in non-territorial species.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Argia damselflies, Genetic divergence, Mating preference, Mechanical isolation, Niche conservatism, Non-territorial, Radiation, Sexual isolation, Sympatric patterns
in
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society
publisher
Linnean Society of London
external identifiers
  • scopus:84996969427
ISSN
0024-4066
DOI
10.1111/bij.12916
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9492c95c-a221-4c09-b63b-7d6a58d433d6
date added to LUP
2017-02-21 11:55:02
date last changed
2017-07-09 04:58:32
@article{9492c95c-a221-4c09-b63b-7d6a58d433d6,
  abstract     = {<p>Isolation barriers work at different instances during the mating process in odonate insects. In territorial damselflies, heterospecific interactions are mainly precluded by sexual (visual) isolation, while in non-territorial damselflies, heterospecific interactions are mostly precluded by mechanical isolation and sexual (tactile) isolation. In this study we investigated the strength of three premating barriers (visual, mechanical and tactile), genetic divergence and degree of sympatry (on their entire distribution) between four non-territorial Argia damselflies (A. anceps, A. extranea, A. oenea and A. tezpi). Our results are explained in the light of learned mating preferences and Kaneshiro's hypothesis. We detected a strong reproductive isolation between all pairs of species by the joint action of the three studied barriers [visual (90.6%), mechanical (8.7%) and tactile (0.7%)]. Sexual (visual) isolation was the most important barrier, perhaps driven by learning mating preferences. One of the studied species, A. extranea, which is the most derived of the studied species, showed a highly asymmetric isolation in reciprocal crosses, which is consistent with Kaneshiro's hypothesis. Moreover, we detected a negligible ecological niche differentiation between the studied species (70% of shared distribution). Our results suggest that sexual (visual) selection may be an important force driving speciation in non-territorial species.</p>},
  author       = {Nava-Bolaños, Angela and Sánchez-Guillén, Rosa A. and Munguía-Steyer, Roberto and Córdoba-Aguilar, Alex},
  issn         = {0024-4066},
  keyword      = {Argia damselflies,Genetic divergence,Mating preference,Mechanical isolation,Niche conservatism,Non-territorial,Radiation,Sexual isolation,Sympatric patterns},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  publisher    = {Linnean Society of London},
  series       = {Biological Journal of the Linnean Society},
  title        = {Isolation barriers and genetic divergence in non-territorial Argia damselflies},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bij.12916},
  year         = {2016},
}