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Dust Evolution and the Formation of Planetesimals

Birnstiel, T.; Fang, M. and Johansen, A. LU (2016) In Space Science Reviews 205(1-4). p.41-75
Abstract

The solid content of circumstellar disks is inherited from the interstellar medium: dust particles of at most a micrometer in size. Protoplanetary disks are the environment where these dust grains need to grow at least 13 orders of magnitude in size. Our understanding of this growth process is far from complete, with different physics seemingly posing obstacles to this growth at various stages. Yet, the ubiquity of planets in our galaxy suggests that planet formation is a robust mechanism. This chapter focuses on the earliest stages of planet formation, the growth of small dust grains towards the gravitationally bound “planetesimals”, the building blocks of planets. We will introduce some of the key physics involved in the growth... (More)

The solid content of circumstellar disks is inherited from the interstellar medium: dust particles of at most a micrometer in size. Protoplanetary disks are the environment where these dust grains need to grow at least 13 orders of magnitude in size. Our understanding of this growth process is far from complete, with different physics seemingly posing obstacles to this growth at various stages. Yet, the ubiquity of planets in our galaxy suggests that planet formation is a robust mechanism. This chapter focuses on the earliest stages of planet formation, the growth of small dust grains towards the gravitationally bound “planetesimals”, the building blocks of planets. We will introduce some of the key physics involved in the growth processes and discuss how they are expected to shape the global behavior of the solid content of disks. We will consider possible pathways towards the formation of larger bodies and conclude by reviewing some of the recent observational advances in the field.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Accretion disks, Circumstellar matter, Planets and satellites: formation, Protoplanetary disks
in
Space Science Reviews
volume
205
issue
1-4
pages
35 pages
publisher
Springer Netherlands
external identifiers
  • scopus:84969219003
  • wos:000391769100003
ISSN
0038-6308
DOI
10.1007/s11214-016-0256-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
95802f2b-81a0-4fae-95ba-9df4caa76b85
date added to LUP
2017-01-13 09:37:20
date last changed
2017-11-12 04:28:03
@article{95802f2b-81a0-4fae-95ba-9df4caa76b85,
  abstract     = {<p>The solid content of circumstellar disks is inherited from the interstellar medium: dust particles of at most a micrometer in size. Protoplanetary disks are the environment where these dust grains need to grow at least 13 orders of magnitude in size. Our understanding of this growth process is far from complete, with different physics seemingly posing obstacles to this growth at various stages. Yet, the ubiquity of planets in our galaxy suggests that planet formation is a robust mechanism. This chapter focuses on the earliest stages of planet formation, the growth of small dust grains towards the gravitationally bound “planetesimals”, the building blocks of planets. We will introduce some of the key physics involved in the growth processes and discuss how they are expected to shape the global behavior of the solid content of disks. We will consider possible pathways towards the formation of larger bodies and conclude by reviewing some of the recent observational advances in the field.</p>},
  author       = {Birnstiel, T. and Fang, M. and Johansen, A.},
  issn         = {0038-6308},
  keyword      = {Accretion disks,Circumstellar matter,Planets and satellites: formation,Protoplanetary disks},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  number       = {1-4},
  pages        = {41--75},
  publisher    = {Springer Netherlands},
  series       = {Space Science Reviews},
  title        = {Dust Evolution and the Formation of Planetesimals},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11214-016-0256-1},
  volume       = {205},
  year         = {2016},
}