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How to Define Pathogenicity, Health, and Disease?

Vihinen, Mauno LU (2017) In Human Mutation 38(2). p.129-136
Abstract

Scientific and clinical communities produce ever increasing amounts of data and details about health and disease. Our ability to understand and utilize this information is limited because of imprecise language and lack of well-defined concepts. This problem involves also the principal concepts of health, disease, and pathogenicity. Here, a systematic model is presented for pathogenicity, as well as for health and disease. It has three components: extent, modulation, and severity, which jointly define the continuum of pathogenicity. The model is population based, and once implemented, it can be used for numerous purposes such as diagnosis, patient stratification, prognosis, finding phenotype–genotype correlations, or explaining adverse... (More)

Scientific and clinical communities produce ever increasing amounts of data and details about health and disease. Our ability to understand and utilize this information is limited because of imprecise language and lack of well-defined concepts. This problem involves also the principal concepts of health, disease, and pathogenicity. Here, a systematic model is presented for pathogenicity, as well as for health and disease. It has three components: extent, modulation, and severity, which jointly define the continuum of pathogenicity. The model is population based, and once implemented, it can be used for numerous purposes such as diagnosis, patient stratification, prognosis, finding phenotype–genotype correlations, or explaining adverse drug reactions. The new model has several benefits including health economy by allowing evidence-based personalized/precision medicine.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
disease, disease extent, disease modulation, disease severity, health, individual variability, pathogenicity, pathogenicity model, pathogenicity zone
in
Human Mutation
volume
38
issue
2
pages
8 pages
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:85008257158
  • wos:000393687800001
ISSN
1059-7794
DOI
10.1002/humu.23144
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
95dffb6f-17d1-469b-bb1e-81803f2b936c
date added to LUP
2017-01-19 11:29:53
date last changed
2018-01-13 00:01:00
@article{95dffb6f-17d1-469b-bb1e-81803f2b936c,
  abstract     = {<p>Scientific and clinical communities produce ever increasing amounts of data and details about health and disease. Our ability to understand and utilize this information is limited because of imprecise language and lack of well-defined concepts. This problem involves also the principal concepts of health, disease, and pathogenicity. Here, a systematic model is presented for pathogenicity, as well as for health and disease. It has three components: extent, modulation, and severity, which jointly define the continuum of pathogenicity. The model is population based, and once implemented, it can be used for numerous purposes such as diagnosis, patient stratification, prognosis, finding phenotype–genotype correlations, or explaining adverse drug reactions. The new model has several benefits including health economy by allowing evidence-based personalized/precision medicine.</p>},
  author       = {Vihinen, Mauno},
  issn         = {1059-7794},
  keyword      = {disease,disease extent,disease modulation,disease severity,health,individual variability,pathogenicity,pathogenicity model,pathogenicity zone},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {129--136},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Human Mutation},
  title        = {How to Define Pathogenicity, Health, and Disease?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.23144},
  volume       = {38},
  year         = {2017},
}