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Methods for performance characterization of artificial molecular motors

Unksov, Ivan LU (2021)
Abstract
The overall aim of this thesis work is to characterize artificial biomolecular motors, specifically the Lawnmower, a motor based on the burn bridges mechanism, and the Tumbleweed, a protein motor that employs ligand specific DNA-proteins binding to step along DNA. An overview of their operational principles is given, and initial results of our studies are presented, along with a review of currently available methods to characterize artificial molecular motors.
One way to characterize the expected 10-15 nm sized steps of Tumbleweed may be to harness the properties of waveguiding nanowires. An outline of such an approach is presented, and a detailed study of underlying physical phenomena is performed. Specifically, to understand what... (More)
The overall aim of this thesis work is to characterize artificial biomolecular motors, specifically the Lawnmower, a motor based on the burn bridges mechanism, and the Tumbleweed, a protein motor that employs ligand specific DNA-proteins binding to step along DNA. An overview of their operational principles is given, and initial results of our studies are presented, along with a review of currently available methods to characterize artificial molecular motors.
One way to characterize the expected 10-15 nm sized steps of Tumbleweed may be to harness the properties of waveguiding nanowires. An outline of such an approach is presented, and a detailed study of underlying physical phenomena is performed. Specifically, to understand what dimensions of nanowires should be used, we study the enhancement of fluorescence excitation, one of the phenomena contributing to guidance of light in gallium phosphide nanowires. We find experimentally, and confirm with modelling, that the nanowires with diameter around 110 nm and 10 nm thick Al2O3 coating maximize the enhancement for red fluorophores, and our modelling suggests that the optimum diameter shifts to smaller diameters for fluorophores with a shorter excitation wavelength. The nanowires are promising for many applications including biosensing.
Plans for further studies are also presented. Specifically, molecular motor studies are proposed on the Tumbleweed or similar motors, and it is described how nanowires may be used to that end. As for the nanowire studies, these may be continued using fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) which would show how the nanowires affect fluorescence emission, and towards the goal to use nanowires in biosensing which might also involve fluorescent noble metal nanoclusters.
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supervisor
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type
Thesis
publication status
published
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59 pages
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
95ff169b-28c1-4a52-9bb6-31a631ce29f7
date added to LUP
2021-04-08 21:58:39
date last changed
2021-04-13 09:03:26
@misc{95ff169b-28c1-4a52-9bb6-31a631ce29f7,
  abstract     = {The overall aim of this thesis work is to characterize artificial biomolecular motors, specifically the Lawnmower, a motor based on the burn bridges mechanism, and the Tumbleweed, a protein motor that employs ligand specific DNA-proteins binding to step along DNA. An overview of their operational principles is given, and initial results of our studies are presented, along with a review of currently available methods to characterize artificial molecular motors. <br/>One way to characterize the expected 10-15 nm sized steps of Tumbleweed may be to harness the properties of waveguiding nanowires. An outline of such an approach is presented, and a detailed study of underlying physical phenomena is performed. Specifically, to understand what dimensions of nanowires should be used, we study the enhancement of fluorescence excitation, one of the phenomena contributing to guidance of light in gallium phosphide nanowires. We find experimentally, and confirm with modelling, that the nanowires with diameter around 110 nm and 10 nm thick Al2O3 coating maximize the enhancement for red fluorophores, and our modelling suggests that the optimum diameter shifts to smaller diameters for fluorophores with a shorter excitation wavelength. The nanowires are promising for many applications including biosensing.<br/>Plans for further studies are also presented. Specifically, molecular motor studies are proposed on the Tumbleweed or similar motors, and it is described how nanowires may be used to that end. As for the nanowire studies, these may be continued using fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) which would show how the nanowires affect fluorescence emission, and towards the goal to use nanowires in biosensing which might also involve fluorescent noble metal nanoclusters. <br/>},
  author       = {Unksov, Ivan},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  note         = {Licentiate Thesis},
  title        = {Methods for performance characterization of artificial molecular motors},
  url          = {https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/ws/files/96566207/LicIU.pdf},
  year         = {2021},
}