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Intermediate phases observed during decomposition of LiBH4

Mosegaard, Lene; Møller, Bitten; Jørgensen, Jens-Erik; Bösenberg, Ulrike; Dornheim, Martin; Hanson, Jonathan C; Cerenius, Yngve LU ; Walker, Gavin; Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen and Besenbacher, Flemming, et al. (2007) 10th International Symposium on Metal-Hydrogen Systems, Fundamentals and Applications In Journal of Alloys and Compounds 446-447. p.301-305
Abstract
Lithium tetrahydridoboranate is among the materials with the highest hydrogen content and has great potential as a possible H-2-storage material, although, the release and uptake of H-2 is not fully understood. In this work, LiBH4 was studied by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (PXD) and solid state CP/MAS NNIR both at variable temperatures. This study revealed two new phases observed during dehydrogenation of LiBH4. Phase I is hexagonal, a = 4.93(2) and c = 13.47(3) angstrom and is observed in the temperature range -200-300 degrees C, and phase II is orthorhombic, a = 8.70(1), b = 5.44(1) and c = 4.44](8) angstrom and is observed in the temperature range similar to 300-400 degrees C applying a constant heating rate... (More)
Lithium tetrahydridoboranate is among the materials with the highest hydrogen content and has great potential as a possible H-2-storage material, although, the release and uptake of H-2 is not fully understood. In this work, LiBH4 was studied by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (PXD) and solid state CP/MAS NNIR both at variable temperatures. This study revealed two new phases observed during dehydrogenation of LiBH4. Phase I is hexagonal, a = 4.93(2) and c = 13.47(3) angstrom and is observed in the temperature range -200-300 degrees C, and phase II is orthorhombic, a = 8.70(1), b = 5.44(1) and c = 4.44](8) angstrom and is observed in the temperature range similar to 300-400 degrees C applying a constant heating rate of 5 degrees C/min. Apparently, I transforms into II, e.g. at a constant temperature of T= 265 degrees C after 5 h. Furthermore, a third phase, III, is observed in the temperature range RT to 70 degrees C, and is caused by a reaction between LiBH4 and water vapor from the atmosphere. Hydrogen release is associated with the decomposition of III at ca. 65 degrees C. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
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in
Journal of Alloys and Compounds
volume
446-447
pages
301 - 305
publisher
Elsevier
conference name
10th International Symposium on Metal-Hydrogen Systems, Fundamentals and Applications
external identifiers
  • wos:000250822900062
  • scopus:35148876674
ISSN
0925-8388
DOI
10.1016/jjailcom.2007.03.057
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
719b34a7-371f-442a-b59a-ba91a258748b (old id 965638)
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2009-07-09 11:49:58
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2017-03-26 04:11:10
@inproceedings{719b34a7-371f-442a-b59a-ba91a258748b,
  abstract     = {Lithium tetrahydridoboranate is among the materials with the highest hydrogen content and has great potential as a possible H-2-storage material, although, the release and uptake of H-2 is not fully understood. In this work, LiBH4 was studied by in situ synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (PXD) and solid state CP/MAS NNIR both at variable temperatures. This study revealed two new phases observed during dehydrogenation of LiBH4. Phase I is hexagonal, a = 4.93(2) and c = 13.47(3) angstrom and is observed in the temperature range -200-300 degrees C, and phase II is orthorhombic, a = 8.70(1), b = 5.44(1) and c = 4.44](8) angstrom and is observed in the temperature range similar to 300-400 degrees C applying a constant heating rate of 5 degrees C/min. Apparently, I transforms into II, e.g. at a constant temperature of T= 265 degrees C after 5 h. Furthermore, a third phase, III, is observed in the temperature range RT to 70 degrees C, and is caused by a reaction between LiBH4 and water vapor from the atmosphere. Hydrogen release is associated with the decomposition of III at ca. 65 degrees C. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Mosegaard, Lene and Møller, Bitten and Jørgensen, Jens-Erik and Bösenberg, Ulrike and Dornheim, Martin and Hanson, Jonathan C and Cerenius, Yngve and Walker, Gavin and Jakobsen, Hans Jørgen and Besenbacher, Flemming and Jensen, Torben R},
  booktitle    = {Journal of Alloys and Compounds},
  issn         = {0925-8388},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {301--305},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  title        = {Intermediate phases observed during decomposition of LiBH4},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/jjailcom.2007.03.057},
  volume       = {446-447},
  year         = {2007},
}