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Ontogeny of sexual dimorphism and phenotypic integration in heritable morphs

Abbott, Jessica LU and Svensson, Erik LU (2008) In Evolutionary Ecology 22(1). p.103-121
Abstract
In this study we investigated the developmental basis of adult phenotypes in a non-model organism, a polymorphic damselfly (Ischnura elegans) with three female colour morphs. This polymorphic species presents an ideal opportunity to study intraspecific variation in growth trajectories, morphological variation in size and shape during the course of ontogeny, and to relate these juvenile differences to the phenotypic differences of the discrete adult phenotypes; the two sexes and the three female morphs. We raised larvae of different families in individual enclosures in the laboratory, and traced morphological changes during the course of ontogeny. We used principal components analysis to examine the effects of Sex, Maternal morph, and Own... (More)
In this study we investigated the developmental basis of adult phenotypes in a non-model organism, a polymorphic damselfly (Ischnura elegans) with three female colour morphs. This polymorphic species presents an ideal opportunity to study intraspecific variation in growth trajectories, morphological variation in size and shape during the course of ontogeny, and to relate these juvenile differences to the phenotypic differences of the discrete adult phenotypes; the two sexes and the three female morphs. We raised larvae of different families in individual enclosures in the laboratory, and traced morphological changes during the course of ontogeny. We used principal components analysis to examine the effects of Sex, Maternal morph, and Own morph on body size and body shape. We also investigated the larval fitness consequences of variation in size and shape by relating these factors to emergence success. Females grew faster than males and were larger as adults, and there was sexual dimorphism in body shape in both larval and adult stages. There were also significant effects of both maternal morph and own morph on growth rate and body shape in the larval stage. There were significant differences in body shape, but not body size, between the adult female morphs, indicating phenotypic integration between colour, melanin patterning, and body shape. Individuals that emerged successfully grew faster and had different body shape in the larval stage, indicating internal (non-ecological) selection on larval morphology. Overall, morphological differences between individuals at the larval stage carried over to the adult stage. Thus, selection in the larval stage can potentially result in correlated responses in adult phenotypes and vice versa. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
antagonistic selection, alternative phenotypes, complex life-cycle, correlational selection, sexual conflict, mimicry
in
Evolutionary Ecology
volume
22
issue
1
pages
103 - 121
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000251651100007
  • scopus:37249042760
ISSN
1573-8477
DOI
10.1007/s10682-007-9161-0
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a6cafc5e-aa0b-4a44-a9c9-c2c4cd6578fa (old id 965932)
date added to LUP
2009-07-10 14:18:51
date last changed
2017-08-20 04:14:18
@article{a6cafc5e-aa0b-4a44-a9c9-c2c4cd6578fa,
  abstract     = {In this study we investigated the developmental basis of adult phenotypes in a non-model organism, a polymorphic damselfly (Ischnura elegans) with three female colour morphs. This polymorphic species presents an ideal opportunity to study intraspecific variation in growth trajectories, morphological variation in size and shape during the course of ontogeny, and to relate these juvenile differences to the phenotypic differences of the discrete adult phenotypes; the two sexes and the three female morphs. We raised larvae of different families in individual enclosures in the laboratory, and traced morphological changes during the course of ontogeny. We used principal components analysis to examine the effects of Sex, Maternal morph, and Own morph on body size and body shape. We also investigated the larval fitness consequences of variation in size and shape by relating these factors to emergence success. Females grew faster than males and were larger as adults, and there was sexual dimorphism in body shape in both larval and adult stages. There were also significant effects of both maternal morph and own morph on growth rate and body shape in the larval stage. There were significant differences in body shape, but not body size, between the adult female morphs, indicating phenotypic integration between colour, melanin patterning, and body shape. Individuals that emerged successfully grew faster and had different body shape in the larval stage, indicating internal (non-ecological) selection on larval morphology. Overall, morphological differences between individuals at the larval stage carried over to the adult stage. Thus, selection in the larval stage can potentially result in correlated responses in adult phenotypes and vice versa.},
  author       = {Abbott, Jessica and Svensson, Erik},
  issn         = {1573-8477},
  keyword      = {antagonistic selection,alternative phenotypes,complex life-cycle,correlational selection,sexual conflict,mimicry},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {103--121},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Evolutionary Ecology},
  title        = {Ontogeny of sexual dimorphism and phenotypic integration in heritable morphs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10682-007-9161-0},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2008},
}