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Characteristics of cardiac arrest and resuscitation by age group: an analysis from the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry

Herlitz, Johan; Svensson, Leif; Engdahl, Johan; Gelberg, Jan LU ; Silfverstolpe, Johan; Wisten, Aase; Angquist, Karl-Axel and Holmberg, Stig (2007) In American Journal of Emergency Medicine 25(9). p.1025-1031
Abstract
Aim: The objective of this study was to describe patients who experienced an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) by age group. Methods: All patients who suffered from an OHCA between 1990 and 2005 and are included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry (n = 40,503) were classified into the following age groups: neonates, younger than 1 year; young children, between 1 and 4 years; older children, between 5 and 12 years; adolescents, between 13 and 17 years; young adults, between 18 and 35 years; adults not retired, between 36 and 64 years; adults retired, between 65 and 79 years; and older adults, 80 years or older. Results: Ventricular fibrillation was lowest in young children (3%) and highest in adults (35%). Survival to I month was... (More)
Aim: The objective of this study was to describe patients who experienced an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) by age group. Methods: All patients who suffered from an OHCA between 1990 and 2005 and are included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry (n = 40,503) were classified into the following age groups: neonates, younger than 1 year; young children, between 1 and 4 years; older children, between 5 and 12 years; adolescents, between 13 and 17 years; young adults, between 18 and 35 years; adults not retired, between 36 and 64 years; adults retired, between 65 and 79 years; and older adults, 80 years or older. Results: Ventricular fibrillation was lowest in young children (3%) and highest in adults (35%). Survival to I month was lowest in neonates (2.6%) and highest in older children (7.8%). Children (<18 years), young adults (18-35 years), and adults (>35 years) survived to 1 month 24.5%,21.2%, and 13.6% of cases, respectively (P = .0003 for trend) when found in a shockable rhythm. The corresponding figures for nonshockable rhythms were 3.8%, 3.2%, and 1.6%, respectively (P < .0001 for trend). Conclusions: There is a large variability in characteristics and outcome among patients in various age groups who experienced an OHCA. Among the large age groups, there was a successive decline in survival with increasing age in shockable and nonshockable rhythms. (C) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
American Journal of Emergency Medicine
volume
25
issue
9
pages
1025 - 1031
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000251568000007
  • scopus:36048931852
ISSN
1532-8171
DOI
10.1016/j.ajem.2007.03.008
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
deafdbf4-7e71-4259-ae24-ff9f1af1d6d9 (old id 966432)
date added to LUP
2008-01-29 15:24:56
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:57:34
@article{deafdbf4-7e71-4259-ae24-ff9f1af1d6d9,
  abstract     = {Aim: The objective of this study was to describe patients who experienced an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) by age group. Methods: All patients who suffered from an OHCA between 1990 and 2005 and are included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry (n = 40,503) were classified into the following age groups: neonates, younger than 1 year; young children, between 1 and 4 years; older children, between 5 and 12 years; adolescents, between 13 and 17 years; young adults, between 18 and 35 years; adults not retired, between 36 and 64 years; adults retired, between 65 and 79 years; and older adults, 80 years or older. Results: Ventricular fibrillation was lowest in young children (3%) and highest in adults (35%). Survival to I month was lowest in neonates (2.6%) and highest in older children (7.8%). Children (&lt;18 years), young adults (18-35 years), and adults (&gt;35 years) survived to 1 month 24.5%,21.2%, and 13.6% of cases, respectively (P = .0003 for trend) when found in a shockable rhythm. The corresponding figures for nonshockable rhythms were 3.8%, 3.2%, and 1.6%, respectively (P &lt; .0001 for trend). Conclusions: There is a large variability in characteristics and outcome among patients in various age groups who experienced an OHCA. Among the large age groups, there was a successive decline in survival with increasing age in shockable and nonshockable rhythms. (C) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Herlitz, Johan and Svensson, Leif and Engdahl, Johan and Gelberg, Jan and Silfverstolpe, Johan and Wisten, Aase and Angquist, Karl-Axel and Holmberg, Stig},
  issn         = {1532-8171},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {1025--1031},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {American Journal of Emergency Medicine},
  title        = {Characteristics of cardiac arrest and resuscitation by age group: an analysis from the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2007.03.008},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2007},
}