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Placing articles in the large publisher nations: Is there a "free lunch" in terms of higher impact?

Schubert, Torben LU and Michels, Carolin (2013) In Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology 64(3). p.596-611
Abstract
This paper deals with the role of a journal's publisher country in determining the expected citation rates of the articles published in it. We analyze whether a paper has a higher citation rate when it is published in one of the large publisher nations, the U.S., U.K., or the Netherlands, compared to a hypothetical situation when the same paper is published in journals of different origin. This would constitute a free lunch, which could be explained by a Matthew effect visible on the country-level, similar to the well-documented Matthew effect on the author-level. We first use a simulation model that highlights increasing citation returns to quality as the central key condition on which such a Matthew effect may emerge. Then we use an... (More)
This paper deals with the role of a journal's publisher country in determining the expected citation rates of the articles published in it. We analyze whether a paper has a higher citation rate when it is published in one of the large publisher nations, the U.S., U.K., or the Netherlands, compared to a hypothetical situation when the same paper is published in journals of different origin. This would constitute a free lunch, which could be explained by a Matthew effect visible on the country-level, similar to the well-documented Matthew effect on the author-level. We first use a simulation model that highlights increasing citation returns to quality as the central key condition on which such a Matthew effect may emerge. Then we use an international bibliometric panel data set of forty-nine countries for the years 2000-2010 and show that such a free lunch implied by this Matthew effect can be observed for top journals from the U.S. and depending on the specification also from the U.K. and the Netherlands, while there is no effect for lower-ranked American journals and negative effects for lower-ranked British journals as well as those coming from the Netherlands. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
socioeconomic activities
in
Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology
volume
64
issue
3
pages
596 - 611
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000323388800013
  • scopus:84874271589
ISSN
1532-2890
DOI
10.1002/asi.22759
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
968bd028-194e-411b-a8b9-7a59681bbdbc (old id 4063624)
date added to LUP
2013-10-03 12:00:56
date last changed
2019-02-20 01:23:32
@article{968bd028-194e-411b-a8b9-7a59681bbdbc,
  abstract     = {This paper deals with the role of a journal's publisher country in determining the expected citation rates of the articles published in it. We analyze whether a paper has a higher citation rate when it is published in one of the large publisher nations, the U.S., U.K., or the Netherlands, compared to a hypothetical situation when the same paper is published in journals of different origin. This would constitute a free lunch, which could be explained by a Matthew effect visible on the country-level, similar to the well-documented Matthew effect on the author-level. We first use a simulation model that highlights increasing citation returns to quality as the central key condition on which such a Matthew effect may emerge. Then we use an international bibliometric panel data set of forty-nine countries for the years 2000-2010 and show that such a free lunch implied by this Matthew effect can be observed for top journals from the U.S. and depending on the specification also from the U.K. and the Netherlands, while there is no effect for lower-ranked American journals and negative effects for lower-ranked British journals as well as those coming from the Netherlands.},
  author       = {Schubert, Torben and Michels, Carolin},
  issn         = {1532-2890},
  keyword      = {socioeconomic activities},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {596--611},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology},
  title        = {Placing articles in the large publisher nations: Is there a "free lunch" in terms of higher impact?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/asi.22759},
  volume       = {64},
  year         = {2013},
}