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The relationship between regional stress field, fracture orientation and depth of weathering and implications for groundwater prospecting in crystalline rocks

Owen, Richard; Maziti, Abel and Dahlin, Torleif LU (2007) In Hydrogeology Journal 15(7). p.1231-1238
Abstract
In a uniform granite gneiss study area in central Zimbabwe, lineaments oriented parallel to the maximum regional compressive stress orientation exhibit the thickest regolith development, while lineaments oriented perpendicular to the maximum compressive stress show the shallowest development of weathered regolith. The principal fracture set orientations were mapped using aerial imagery. The regional stress field, estimated from global stress maps, was used to determine the stresses acting on each principal lineament orientation. Multi-electrode resistivity profiling was carried out across fractures with different orientations to determine their subsurface regolith conditions. The results indicate that the 360 and 060 degrees lineaments,... (More)
In a uniform granite gneiss study area in central Zimbabwe, lineaments oriented parallel to the maximum regional compressive stress orientation exhibit the thickest regolith development, while lineaments oriented perpendicular to the maximum compressive stress show the shallowest development of weathered regolith. The principal fracture set orientations were mapped using aerial imagery. The regional stress field, estimated from global stress maps, was used to determine the stresses acting on each principal lineament orientation. Multi-electrode resistivity profiling was carried out across fractures with different orientations to determine their subsurface regolith conditions. The results indicate that the 360 and 060 degrees lineaments, which are sub-parallel to the principal compressive stress orientation (sigma(1)) exhibit maximum development of the regolith, while 130 degrees lineaments perpendicular to sigma(1) do not exhibit significant regolith development. Since regolith thickness has been positively correlated with groundwater resources, it is suggested that fractures with orientations sub-parallel to the principal compressive stress direction constitute favourable groundwater targets. Knowledge of the regional stress field and fracture set orientations can be used as an effective low cost tool for locating potentially higher yielding boreholes in crystalline rock terrains. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
of weathering, depth, stress field, fractured rocks, Zimbabwe, groundwater exploration
in
Hydrogeology Journal
volume
15
issue
7
pages
1231 - 1238
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000251061200001
  • scopus:36448983623
ISSN
1431-2174
DOI
10.1007/s10040-007-0224-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
572ff8e5-aff5-44a7-a653-68827e5bdb98 (old id 969078)
date added to LUP
2008-01-30 07:43:34
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:36:27
@article{572ff8e5-aff5-44a7-a653-68827e5bdb98,
  abstract     = {In a uniform granite gneiss study area in central Zimbabwe, lineaments oriented parallel to the maximum regional compressive stress orientation exhibit the thickest regolith development, while lineaments oriented perpendicular to the maximum compressive stress show the shallowest development of weathered regolith. The principal fracture set orientations were mapped using aerial imagery. The regional stress field, estimated from global stress maps, was used to determine the stresses acting on each principal lineament orientation. Multi-electrode resistivity profiling was carried out across fractures with different orientations to determine their subsurface regolith conditions. The results indicate that the 360 and 060 degrees lineaments, which are sub-parallel to the principal compressive stress orientation (sigma(1)) exhibit maximum development of the regolith, while 130 degrees lineaments perpendicular to sigma(1) do not exhibit significant regolith development. Since regolith thickness has been positively correlated with groundwater resources, it is suggested that fractures with orientations sub-parallel to the principal compressive stress direction constitute favourable groundwater targets. Knowledge of the regional stress field and fracture set orientations can be used as an effective low cost tool for locating potentially higher yielding boreholes in crystalline rock terrains.},
  author       = {Owen, Richard and Maziti, Abel and Dahlin, Torleif},
  issn         = {1431-2174},
  keyword      = {of weathering,depth,stress field,fractured rocks,Zimbabwe,groundwater exploration},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1231--1238},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Hydrogeology Journal},
  title        = {The relationship between regional stress field, fracture orientation and depth of weathering and implications for groundwater prospecting in crystalline rocks},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10040-007-0224-7},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2007},
}