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Colour in the eye of the beholder : receptor sensitivities and neural circuits underlying colour opponency and colour perception

Kelber, Almut LU (2016) In Current Opinion in Neurobiology 41. p.106-112
Abstract

Colour vision — the ability to discriminate spectral differences irrespective of variations in intensity — has two basic requirements: (1) photoreceptors with different spectral sensitivities, and (2) neural comparison of signals from these photoreceptors. Major progress has been made understanding the evolution of the basic stages of colour vision–opsin pigments, screening pigments, and the first neurons coding chromatic opponency, and similarities between mammals and insects point to general mechanisms. However, much work is still needed to unravel full colour pathways in various animals. While primates may have brain regions entirely dedicated to colour coding, animals with small brains, such as insects, likely combine colour... (More)

Colour vision — the ability to discriminate spectral differences irrespective of variations in intensity — has two basic requirements: (1) photoreceptors with different spectral sensitivities, and (2) neural comparison of signals from these photoreceptors. Major progress has been made understanding the evolution of the basic stages of colour vision–opsin pigments, screening pigments, and the first neurons coding chromatic opponency, and similarities between mammals and insects point to general mechanisms. However, much work is still needed to unravel full colour pathways in various animals. While primates may have brain regions entirely dedicated to colour coding, animals with small brains, such as insects, likely combine colour information directly in parallel multisensory pathways controlling various behaviours.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Current Opinion in Neurobiology
volume
41
pages
7 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • Scopus:84987933017
ISSN
0959-4388
DOI
10.1016/j.conb.2016.09.007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
96b602c3-30f0-46fc-8949-828393699172
date added to LUP
2016-10-12 10:17:57
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:36:26
@article{96b602c3-30f0-46fc-8949-828393699172,
  abstract     = {<p>Colour vision — the ability to discriminate spectral differences irrespective of variations in intensity — has two basic requirements: (1) photoreceptors with different spectral sensitivities, and (2) neural comparison of signals from these photoreceptors. Major progress has been made understanding the evolution of the basic stages of colour vision–opsin pigments, screening pigments, and the first neurons coding chromatic opponency, and similarities between mammals and insects point to general mechanisms. However, much work is still needed to unravel full colour pathways in various animals. While primates may have brain regions entirely dedicated to colour coding, animals with small brains, such as insects, likely combine colour information directly in parallel multisensory pathways controlling various behaviours.</p>},
  author       = {Kelber, Almut},
  issn         = {0959-4388},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  pages        = {106--112},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Current Opinion in Neurobiology},
  title        = {Colour in the eye of the beholder : receptor sensitivities and neural circuits underlying colour opponency and colour perception},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.conb.2016.09.007},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2016},
}