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Pulse perfusion values to predict eye opening after intravenous anesthesia : An explorative study

Enekvist, Bruno LU and Johansson, Anders LU (2016) In AANA Journal 84(4). p.255-259
Abstract

Variables measured in modern pulse oximetry apparatuses include a graphic pulse curve and a specified perfusion value (PV) that could be a sensitive marker for detecting differences in sympathetic activity. We hypothesized that there is a correlation between a reduction of PV and the time to eye opening after anesthesia with propofol-remifentanil. This study includes 29 patients, ASA physical status 1 or 2, scheduled for elective thyroid surgery. Main outcome measures were PV measured by pulse oximetry, heart rate, and noninvasive mean arterial blood pressure recorded before anesthesia, 15 minutes after induction, and at start of surgery, end of surgery, and eye opening at the end of anesthesia. Carbon dioxide... (More)

Variables measured in modern pulse oximetry apparatuses include a graphic pulse curve and a specified perfusion value (PV) that could be a sensitive marker for detecting differences in sympathetic activity. We hypothesized that there is a correlation between a reduction of PV and the time to eye opening after anesthesia with propofol-remifentanil. This study includes 29 patients, ASA physical status 1 or 2, scheduled for elective thyroid surgery. Main outcome measures were PV measured by pulse oximetry, heart rate, and noninvasive mean arterial blood pressure recorded before anesthesia, 15 minutes after induction, and at start of surgery, end of surgery, and eye opening at the end of anesthesia. Carbon dioxide (PETCO2) and oxygen inspiratory (FI-PO2) and expiratory (FE-PO2) concentrations were measured at all times except before anesthesia. Results demonstrated that PVs before anesthesia and at eye opening were lower than 15 minutes after induction and at end of surgery (P <.05). The PETCO2 and difference of FI-PETO2 increased at eye opening compared with the end of surgery (P <.05). We conclude that the pulse oximetry PV and the increased PETCO2 could be useful variables to predict timing of recovery in terms of eye opening after intravenous anesthesia.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Carbon dioxide, Inspiratory and expiratory oxygen, Intravenous anesthesia, Perfusion, Plethysmography, Pulse oximeter
in
AANA Journal
volume
84
issue
4
pages
5 pages
publisher
AANA Publishing Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:84996618783
ISSN
0094-6354
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
97cfdc87-b1d5-40ce-b487-53783d71cad2
alternative location
http://www.aana.com/newsandjournal/20102019/pulse-perfusion-0816-pp255-259.pdf
date added to LUP
2016-12-30 13:13:10
date last changed
2017-10-24 10:11:58
@article{97cfdc87-b1d5-40ce-b487-53783d71cad2,
  abstract     = {<p>Variables measured in modern pulse oximetry apparatuses include a graphic pulse curve and a specified perfusion value (PV) that could be a sensitive marker for detecting differences in sympathetic activity. We hypothesized that there is a correlation between a reduction of PV and the time to eye opening after anesthesia with propofol-remifentanil. This study includes 29 patients, ASA physical status 1 or 2, scheduled for elective thyroid surgery. Main outcome measures were PV measured by pulse oximetry, heart rate, and noninvasive mean arterial blood pressure recorded before anesthesia, 15 minutes after induction, and at start of surgery, end of surgery, and eye opening at the end of anesthesia. Carbon dioxide (P<sub>ET</sub>CO<sub>2</sub>) and oxygen inspiratory (F<sub>I-</sub>PO<sub>2</sub>) and expiratory (F<sub>E</sub>-PO<sub>2</sub>) concentrations were measured at all times except before anesthesia. Results demonstrated that PVs before anesthesia and at eye opening were lower than 15 minutes after induction and at end of surgery (P &lt;.05). The P<sub>ET</sub>CO<sub>2</sub> and difference of F<sub>I-</sub>P<sub>ET</sub>O<sub>2</sub> increased at eye opening compared with the end of surgery (P &lt;.05). We conclude that the pulse oximetry PV and the increased P<sub>ET</sub>CO<sub>2</sub> could be useful variables to predict timing of recovery in terms of eye opening after intravenous anesthesia.</p>},
  author       = {Enekvist, Bruno and Johansson, Anders},
  issn         = {0094-6354},
  keyword      = {Carbon dioxide,Inspiratory and expiratory oxygen,Intravenous anesthesia,Perfusion,Plethysmography,Pulse oximeter},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {255--259},
  publisher    = {AANA Publishing Inc.},
  series       = {AANA Journal},
  title        = {Pulse perfusion values to predict eye opening after intravenous anesthesia : An explorative study},
  volume       = {84},
  year         = {2016},
}