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Monoaminergic neurons in the nervous system of crustaceans.

Aramant, Robert and Elofsson, Rolf LU (1976) In Cell and Tissue Research 170. p.231-251
Abstract
Certain neurons in the nervous system of the malacostracan crustaceans give rise to a predominantly green and a sparse yellow fluorophore in the histochemical fluorescence method of Falck-Hillarp. The same applies to the whole of Crustacea. The green fluorophore is probably a catecholamine; the yellow to brown-yellow has not yet been identified.

The biogenic amine responsible for the green fluorescence, besides being found in diffusely distributed fibres, also appears in distinct areas of fibre concentrations in the central nervous system. The protocerebrum of the malacostracans contains three areas: the central body and two areas in the top of the brain, one anterior and one posterior. The latter two are not recognized as... (More)
Certain neurons in the nervous system of the malacostracan crustaceans give rise to a predominantly green and a sparse yellow fluorophore in the histochemical fluorescence method of Falck-Hillarp. The same applies to the whole of Crustacea. The green fluorophore is probably a catecholamine; the yellow to brown-yellow has not yet been identified.

The biogenic amine responsible for the green fluorescence, besides being found in diffusely distributed fibres, also appears in distinct areas of fibre concentrations in the central nervous system. The protocerebrum of the malacostracans contains three areas: the central body and two areas in the top of the brain, one anterior and one posterior. The latter two are not recognized as separate areas in ordinary histological preparations. In addition, the optic neuropiles are fluorescent, some with a distinct stratification of the fluorophore. The deuto and tritocerebrum and the ventral nerve cord also contain monoaminergic neurons. Of the brightly fluorescent areas in the whole of Crustacea, only the central body consistently exists in all species. The other areas of concentrated fluorescent neuropile are restricted to smaller taxonomic units and differ from each other. p The monoaminergic neurons in Crustacea are sensory, motor, and internuncial, and also belong to a fourth type which mimics the neurosecretory neurons in neurohaemal organs. Only one example of a monoaminergic sensory neuron is known (in Anemia, a non-malacostracan, Aramant and Elofsson 1976), a few motor and a few neurosecretory mimics (the latter in malacostracans). Most are internuncials.
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
monoamines
in
Cell and Tissue Research
volume
170
pages
231 - 251
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:0017134215
ISSN
1432-0878
DOI
10.1007/BF00224301
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
985b9233-e129-46a0-8d73-2a111cfeec44
date added to LUP
2016-12-03 12:20:34
date last changed
2017-03-05 04:38:45
@article{985b9233-e129-46a0-8d73-2a111cfeec44,
  abstract     = {Certain neurons in the nervous system of the malacostracan crustaceans give rise to a predominantly green and a sparse yellow fluorophore in the histochemical fluorescence method of Falck-Hillarp. The same applies to the whole of Crustacea. The green fluorophore is probably a catecholamine; the yellow to brown-yellow has not yet been identified.<br/><br/>The biogenic amine responsible for the green fluorescence, besides being found in diffusely distributed fibres, also appears in distinct areas of fibre concentrations in the central nervous system. The protocerebrum of the malacostracans contains three areas: the central body and two areas in the top of the brain, one anterior and one posterior. The latter two are not recognized as separate areas in ordinary histological preparations. In addition, the optic neuropiles are fluorescent, some with a distinct stratification of the fluorophore. The deuto and tritocerebrum and the ventral nerve cord also contain monoaminergic neurons. Of the brightly fluorescent areas in the whole of Crustacea, only the central body consistently exists in all species. The other areas of concentrated fluorescent neuropile are restricted to smaller taxonomic units and differ from each other. p The monoaminergic neurons in Crustacea are sensory, motor, and internuncial, and also belong to a fourth type which mimics the neurosecretory neurons in neurohaemal organs. Only one example of a monoaminergic sensory neuron is known (in Anemia, a non-malacostracan, Aramant and Elofsson 1976), a few motor and a few neurosecretory mimics (the latter in malacostracans). Most are internuncials.<br/>},
  author       = {Aramant, Robert and Elofsson, Rolf},
  issn         = {1432-0878},
  keyword      = {monoamines},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {231--251},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Cell and Tissue Research},
  title        = {Monoaminergic neurons in the nervous system of crustaceans.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00224301},
  volume       = {170},
  year         = {1976},
}