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The outcome of epiduroscopy treatment in patients with chronic low back pain and radicular pain, operated or non-operated for lumbar disc herniation : A retrospective study in 88 patients

Hazer, Derya Burcu; Acarbaş, Arsal and Rosberg, Hans Eric LU (2018) In Korean Journal of Pain 31(2). p.109-115
Abstract

Background: Patients with lumbar disc herniation are treated with physiotherapy/medication and some with surgery. However, even after technically successful surgery some develop a failed back syndrome with persistent pain. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of epiduroscopy in patients who suffer chronic low back pain and/or radicular pain with or without surgery and the gender difference in outcome. Methods: A total of 88 patients were included with a mean age of 52 years (27-82), 54 women and 34 men. 66 of them were operated previously and 22 were non-operated. They all had persistent chronic back pain and radicular pain despite of medication and physical rehabilitation. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain and Oswestry Disability... (More)

Background: Patients with lumbar disc herniation are treated with physiotherapy/medication and some with surgery. However, even after technically successful surgery some develop a failed back syndrome with persistent pain. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of epiduroscopy in patients who suffer chronic low back pain and/or radicular pain with or without surgery and the gender difference in outcome. Methods: A total of 88 patients were included with a mean age of 52 years (27-82), 54 women and 34 men. 66 of them were operated previously and 22 were non-operated. They all had persistent chronic back pain and radicular pain despite of medication and physical rehabilitation. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were evaluated preoperatively, after one month, six months and one-year after the epiduroscopy. Results: All patients, and also the subgroups (gender and operated/non-operated) improved significantly in pain (VAS) and disability (ODI) at one month. A significant improvement was also seen at one year. No differences were found between men and woman at the different follow-up times. A slight worsening in VAS and ODI was noticed over time except for the non-operated group. Conclusions: Epiduroscopy helps to improve the back and leg pain due to lumbar disc herniation in the early stage. At one year an improvement still exists, and the non-operated group seems to benefit most of the procedure.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Disability evaluation, Endoscopy, Epidural space, Intervertebral disc displacement, Low back pain, Pain measurement, Radiating pain, Sex, Surgery
in
Korean Journal of Pain
volume
31
issue
2
pages
7 pages
publisher
The Korean Pain Society
external identifiers
  • scopus:85045007694
ISSN
2005-9159
DOI
10.3344/kjp.2018.31.2.109
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
98678f64-728b-4352-b4c0-fb976022c9dd
date added to LUP
2018-04-19 14:15:11
date last changed
2019-08-14 04:14:50
@article{98678f64-728b-4352-b4c0-fb976022c9dd,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Patients with lumbar disc herniation are treated with physiotherapy/medication and some with surgery. However, even after technically successful surgery some develop a failed back syndrome with persistent pain. Our aim was to evaluate the efficacy of epiduroscopy in patients who suffer chronic low back pain and/or radicular pain with or without surgery and the gender difference in outcome. Methods: A total of 88 patients were included with a mean age of 52 years (27-82), 54 women and 34 men. 66 of them were operated previously and 22 were non-operated. They all had persistent chronic back pain and radicular pain despite of medication and physical rehabilitation. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were evaluated preoperatively, after one month, six months and one-year after the epiduroscopy. Results: All patients, and also the subgroups (gender and operated/non-operated) improved significantly in pain (VAS) and disability (ODI) at one month. A significant improvement was also seen at one year. No differences were found between men and woman at the different follow-up times. A slight worsening in VAS and ODI was noticed over time except for the non-operated group. Conclusions: Epiduroscopy helps to improve the back and leg pain due to lumbar disc herniation in the early stage. At one year an improvement still exists, and the non-operated group seems to benefit most of the procedure.</p>},
  author       = {Hazer, Derya Burcu and Acarbaş, Arsal and Rosberg, Hans Eric},
  issn         = {2005-9159},
  keyword      = {Disability evaluation,Endoscopy,Epidural space,Intervertebral disc displacement,Low back pain,Pain measurement,Radiating pain,Sex,Surgery},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {109--115},
  publisher    = {The Korean Pain Society},
  series       = {Korean Journal of Pain},
  title        = {The outcome of epiduroscopy treatment in patients with chronic low back pain and radicular pain, operated or non-operated for lumbar disc herniation : A retrospective study in 88 patients},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3344/kjp.2018.31.2.109},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2018},
}