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Ambient temperature effects on stress-induced hyperthermia in Svalbard ptarmigan

Nord, Andreas LU and Folkow, Lars P. (2019) In Biology Open 8.
Abstract
Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) is commonly observed during handling in homeotherms. However, in birds, handling in cold environments typically elicits hypothermia. It is unclear whether this indicates that SIH is differently regulated in this taxon or if it is due to size, because body temperatures changes during handling in low temperature have only been measured in small birds ≤0.03 kg (that are more likely to suffer high heat loss when handled). We have, therefore, studied thermal responses to handling stress in the intermediate-sized (0.5-1.0 kg) Svalbard ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea) in 0°C and −20°C, in winter and spring. Handling caused elevated core body temperature, and peripheral vasoconstriction that reduced back skin... (More)
Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) is commonly observed during handling in homeotherms. However, in birds, handling in cold environments typically elicits hypothermia. It is unclear whether this indicates that SIH is differently regulated in this taxon or if it is due to size, because body temperatures changes during handling in low temperature have only been measured in small birds ≤0.03 kg (that are more likely to suffer high heat loss when handled). We have, therefore, studied thermal responses to handling stress in the intermediate-sized (0.5-1.0 kg) Svalbard ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea) in 0°C and −20°C, in winter and spring. Handling caused elevated core body temperature, and peripheral vasoconstriction that reduced back skin temperature. Core temperature increased less and back skin temperature decreased more in −20°C than in 0°C, probably because of higher heat loss rate at the lower temperature. Responses were qualitatively consistent between seasons, despite higher body condition/insulation in winter and dramatic seasonal changes in photoperiod, possibly affecting stress responsiveness. Our study supports the notion that SIH is a general thermoregulatory reaction to acute stressors in endotherms, but also suggests that body size and thermal environment should be taken into account when evaluating this response in birds. (Less)
Abstract (Swedish)
Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) is commonly observed during handling in homeotherms. However, in birds, handling in cold environments typically elicits hypothermia. It is unclear whether this indicates that SIH is differently regulated in this taxon or if it is due to size, because body temperatures changes during handling in low temperature have only been measured in small birds ≤0.03 kg (that are more likely to suffer high heat loss when handled). We have, therefore, studied thermal responses to handling stress in the intermediate-sized (0.5-1.0 kg) Svalbard ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea) in 0°C and −20°C, in winter and spring. Handling caused elevated core body temperature, and peripheral vasoconstriction that reduced back skin... (More)
Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) is commonly observed during handling in homeotherms. However, in birds, handling in cold environments typically elicits hypothermia. It is unclear whether this indicates that SIH is differently regulated in this taxon or if it is due to size, because body temperatures changes during handling in low temperature have only been measured in small birds ≤0.03 kg (that are more likely to suffer high heat loss when handled). We have, therefore, studied thermal responses to handling stress in the intermediate-sized (0.5-1.0 kg) Svalbard ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea) in 0°C and −20°C, in winter and spring. Handling caused elevated core body temperature, and peripheral vasoconstriction that reduced back skin temperature. Core temperature increased less and back skin temperature decreased more in −20°C than in 0°C, probably because of higher heat loss rate at the lower temperature. Responses were qualitatively consistent between seasons, despite higher body condition/insulation in winter and dramatic seasonal changes in photoperiod, possibly affecting stress responsiveness. Our study supports the notion that SIH is a general thermoregulatory reaction to acute stressors in endotherms, but also suggests that body size and thermal environment should be taken into account when evaluating this response in birds. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
stress, bird, hyperthermia, thermoregulation, Arctic, polar, homeothermy, fight or flight, handling
in
Biology Open
volume
8
article number
bio043497
pages
5 pages
publisher
The Company of Biologists Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85068049877
  • pmid:31182628
ISSN
2046-6390
DOI
10.1242/bio.043497
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
98c31de2-3922-45f1-9cfc-e08507bee080
date added to LUP
2019-06-18 16:46:36
date last changed
2020-01-13 02:02:33
@article{98c31de2-3922-45f1-9cfc-e08507bee080,
  abstract     = {Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) is commonly observed during handling in homeotherms. However, in birds, handling in cold environments typically elicits hypothermia. It is unclear whether this indicates that SIH is differently regulated in this taxon or if it is due to size, because body temperatures changes during handling in low temperature have only been measured in small birds ≤0.03 kg (that are more likely to suffer high heat loss when handled). We have, therefore, studied thermal responses to handling stress in the intermediate-sized (0.5-1.0 kg) Svalbard ptarmigan (Lagopus muta hyperborea) in 0°C and −20°C, in winter and spring. Handling caused elevated core body temperature, and peripheral vasoconstriction that reduced back skin temperature. Core temperature increased less and back skin temperature decreased more in −20°C than in 0°C, probably because of higher heat loss rate at the lower temperature. Responses were qualitatively consistent between seasons, despite higher body condition/insulation in winter and dramatic seasonal changes in photoperiod, possibly affecting stress responsiveness. Our study supports the notion that SIH is a general thermoregulatory reaction to acute stressors in endotherms, but also suggests that body size and thermal environment should be taken into account when evaluating this response in birds.},
  author       = {Nord, Andreas and Folkow, Lars P.},
  issn         = {2046-6390},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {The Company of Biologists Ltd},
  series       = {Biology Open},
  title        = {Ambient temperature effects on stress-induced hyperthermia in Svalbard ptarmigan},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/bio.043497},
  doi          = {10.1242/bio.043497},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2019},
}