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Rhabdom adaptation and its phylogenetic significance

Elofsson, Rolf LU (1976) In Zoologica Scripta 5. p.97-101
Abstract
Rhabdom adaptation and its phylogenetic significance. Zool. Scr. 5 (3–4): 97–101, 1976. — The rhabdoms of arthropod compound eyes are structurally differentiated into open, fused layered, and fused continuous. All are capable of perceiving polarized light. The fused layered, and under certain conditions the fused continuous, perform particularly well. — The fused layered rhabdoms occur in malacostracan crustaceans and in various insect groups. This, together with, among other things, the presence of open rhabdoms in insects and crustaceans, indicates convergent development of organs and parts of organs. — Elaborate visual organs of more than one kind occur in crustaceans, as is exemplified by the compound and nauplius eyes. This shows that... (More)
Rhabdom adaptation and its phylogenetic significance. Zool. Scr. 5 (3–4): 97–101, 1976. — The rhabdoms of arthropod compound eyes are structurally differentiated into open, fused layered, and fused continuous. All are capable of perceiving polarized light. The fused layered, and under certain conditions the fused continuous, perform particularly well. — The fused layered rhabdoms occur in malacostracan crustaceans and in various insect groups. This, together with, among other things, the presence of open rhabdoms in insects and crustaceans, indicates convergent development of organs and parts of organs. — Elaborate visual organs of more than one kind occur in crustaceans, as is exemplified by the compound and nauplius eyes. This shows that more than one construction on the organ level is possible in a restricted taxo-nomical unit for the. perception of light. The different rhabdom types performing well in receiving polarized light also show parallel evolution on a level below the organ. — The result of adaptation analyses indicates the need for a restricted use of the concept of homology basic to morphological investigations and a base for phylogenetic speculations. It also envisages a fruitful approach to a peep into the workshop of evolution. — It is concluded that a fully formed compound eye in arthropod ancestors is hardly conceivable. A realistic alternative is an inherent capacity of forming a compound eye. Thus the ancestral compound eye could have ranged from nothing to a partly-developed stage. The recent eyes need not originate from one source. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Zoologica Scripta
volume
5
pages
97 - 101
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:0007235797
ISSN
0300-3256
DOI
10.1111/j.1463-6409.1976.tb00685.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
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9a1a2f3a-680f-429c-ac61-94335ac8b23f
date added to LUP
2016-12-03 12:18:36
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:41:39
@article{9a1a2f3a-680f-429c-ac61-94335ac8b23f,
  abstract     = {Rhabdom adaptation and its phylogenetic significance. Zool. Scr. 5 (3–4): 97–101, 1976. — The rhabdoms of arthropod compound eyes are structurally differentiated into open, fused layered, and fused continuous. All are capable of perceiving polarized light. The fused layered, and under certain conditions the fused continuous, perform particularly well. — The fused layered rhabdoms occur in malacostracan crustaceans and in various insect groups. This, together with, among other things, the presence of open rhabdoms in insects and crustaceans, indicates convergent development of organs and parts of organs. — Elaborate visual organs of more than one kind occur in crustaceans, as is exemplified by the compound and nauplius eyes. This shows that more than one construction on the organ level is possible in a restricted taxo-nomical unit for the. perception of light. The different rhabdom types performing well in receiving polarized light also show parallel evolution on a level below the organ. — The result of adaptation analyses indicates the need for a restricted use of the concept of homology basic to morphological investigations and a base for phylogenetic speculations. It also envisages a fruitful approach to a peep into the workshop of evolution. — It is concluded that a fully formed compound eye in arthropod ancestors is hardly conceivable. A realistic alternative is an inherent capacity of forming a compound eye. Thus the ancestral compound eye could have ranged from nothing to a partly-developed stage. The recent eyes need not originate from one source.},
  author       = {Elofsson, Rolf},
  issn         = {0300-3256},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {97--101},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Zoologica Scripta},
  title        = {Rhabdom adaptation and its phylogenetic significance},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1463-6409.1976.tb00685.x},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {1976},
}