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Two-step production of monoamines in monoenzymatic cells in the spinal cord : A different control strategy of neurotransmitter supply?

Zhang, Mengliang LU (2016) In Neural Regeneration Research 11(12). p.1904-1909
Abstract

Monoamine neurotransmitters play an important role in the modulation of sensory, motor and autonomic functions in the spinal cord. Although traditionally it is believed that in mammalian spinal cord, monoamine neurotransmitters mainly originate from the brain, accumulating evidence indicates that especially when the spinal cord is injured, they can also be produced in the spinal cord. In this review, I will present evidence for a possible pathway for two-step synthesis of dopamine and serotonin in the spinal cord. Published data from different sources and unpublished data from my own ongoing projects indicate that monoenzymatic cells expressing aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) or tryptophan... (More)

Monoamine neurotransmitters play an important role in the modulation of sensory, motor and autonomic functions in the spinal cord. Although traditionally it is believed that in mammalian spinal cord, monoamine neurotransmitters mainly originate from the brain, accumulating evidence indicates that especially when the spinal cord is injured, they can also be produced in the spinal cord. In this review, I will present evidence for a possible pathway for two-step synthesis of dopamine and serotonin in the spinal cord. Published data from different sources and unpublished data from my own ongoing projects indicate that monoenzymatic cells expressing aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) or tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) are present in the spinal cord and that these TH and THP cells often lie in close proximity to AADC cells. Prompted by the above evidence, I hypothesize that dopamine and serotonin could be synthesized sequentially in two monoenzymatic cells in the spinal cord via a TH-AADC and a TPH-AADC cascade respectively. The monoamines synthesized through this pathway may compensate for lost neurotransmitters following spinal cord injury and also may play specific roles in the recovery of sensory, motor and autonomic functions.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
5-hydroxytryptophan, Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, Dopamine, L-dopa, Monoamine precursor, Non-monoaminergic cell, Serotonin, Spinal cord injury, Tryptophan hydroxylase, Tyrosine hydroxylase
in
Neural Regeneration Research
volume
11
issue
12
pages
6 pages
publisher
Shenyang Editorial Dept Neural Regeneration Res
external identifiers
  • scopus:85009204478
  • wos:000393890900006
ISSN
1673-5374
DOI
10.4103/1673-5374.197124
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9a61eb3f-8c54-482b-b9ab-17e99c703a0d
date added to LUP
2017-01-27 07:09:38
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:34:20
@article{9a61eb3f-8c54-482b-b9ab-17e99c703a0d,
  abstract     = {<p>Monoamine neurotransmitters play an important role in the modulation of sensory, motor and autonomic functions in the spinal cord. Although traditionally it is believed that in mammalian spinal cord, monoamine neurotransmitters mainly originate from the brain, accumulating evidence indicates that especially when the spinal cord is injured, they can also be produced in the spinal cord. In this review, I will present evidence for a possible pathway for two-step synthesis of dopamine and serotonin in the spinal cord. Published data from different sources and unpublished data from my own ongoing projects indicate that monoenzymatic cells expressing aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) or tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) are present in the spinal cord and that these TH and THP cells often lie in close proximity to AADC cells. Prompted by the above evidence, I hypothesize that dopamine and serotonin could be synthesized sequentially in two monoenzymatic cells in the spinal cord via a TH-AADC and a TPH-AADC cascade respectively. The monoamines synthesized through this pathway may compensate for lost neurotransmitters following spinal cord injury and also may play specific roles in the recovery of sensory, motor and autonomic functions.</p>},
  author       = {Zhang, Mengliang},
  issn         = {1673-5374},
  keyword      = {5-hydroxytryptophan,Aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase,Dopamine,L-dopa,Monoamine precursor,Non-monoaminergic cell,Serotonin,Spinal cord injury,Tryptophan hydroxylase,Tyrosine hydroxylase},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {1904--1909},
  publisher    = {Shenyang Editorial Dept Neural Regeneration Res},
  series       = {Neural Regeneration Research},
  title        = {Two-step production of monoamines in monoenzymatic cells in the spinal cord : A different control strategy of neurotransmitter supply?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/1673-5374.197124},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2016},
}