Advanced

Removing MOVE : A case study of intersectional invisibility within religious and legal studies

Fiscella, Anthony T. LU (2016) In International Journal for the Study of New Religions 7(1). p.3-41
Abstract

How is it that a group that self-identifies as “religious” and is associated with one of the most dramatic events in the United States during the 1980s could receive almost no attention from religious studies scholars? Furthermore, how is it that the court case in which said group was determined to not qualify as a “religion” has been discussed and challenged by legal scholars while being virtually ignored by religious scholars? This article documents and examines the treatment of The MOVE Organization within both religious and legal studies. Drawing on intersectionality theory, it is posited that the social locations of many MOVE members including racial status, commitment to the defense of animals, legal religious status, and... (More)

How is it that a group that self-identifies as “religious” and is associated with one of the most dramatic events in the United States during the 1980s could receive almost no attention from religious studies scholars? Furthermore, how is it that the court case in which said group was determined to not qualify as a “religion” has been discussed and challenged by legal scholars while being virtually ignored by religious scholars? This article documents and examines the treatment of The MOVE Organization within both religious and legal studies. Drawing on intersectionality theory, it is posited that the social locations of many MOVE members including racial status, commitment to the defense of animals, legal religious status, and incarceration status combine together and contribute strongly to the marginalization of them and their voices from the scope and concerns of dominant scholarship. If colorblind racism is one factor in sustaining racial domination, then exposure of the complexity of intersectional dynamics might help untangle, in the words of Patricia Hill Collins, a “matrix of domination.”

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Animal rights, Critical race theory, First amendment, Free exercise, Intersectionality, John africa, Law, New religious movements, Nrms, Postcolonial theory, Prison studies, The move organization
in
International Journal for the Study of New Religions
volume
7
issue
1
pages
39 pages
publisher
Equinox Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:84982839444
  • wos:000383851700002
ISSN
2041-9511
DOI
10.1558/ijsnr.v7i1.20308
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9ac00dcf-f5a9-48fc-bdc8-ffdc284b7582
date added to LUP
2017-02-16 09:15:04
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:32:45
@article{9ac00dcf-f5a9-48fc-bdc8-ffdc284b7582,
  abstract     = {<p>How is it that a group that self-identifies as “religious” and is associated with one of the most dramatic events in the United States during the 1980s could receive almost no attention from religious studies scholars? Furthermore, how is it that the court case in which said group was determined to not qualify as a “religion” has been discussed and challenged by legal scholars while being virtually ignored by religious scholars? This article documents and examines the treatment of The MOVE Organization within both religious and legal studies. Drawing on intersectionality theory, it is posited that the social locations of many MOVE members including racial status, commitment to the defense of animals, legal religious status, and incarceration status combine together and contribute strongly to the marginalization of them and their voices from the scope and concerns of dominant scholarship. If colorblind racism is one factor in sustaining racial domination, then exposure of the complexity of intersectional dynamics might help untangle, in the words of Patricia Hill Collins, a “matrix of domination.”</p>},
  author       = {Fiscella, Anthony T.},
  issn         = {2041-9511},
  keyword      = {Animal rights,Critical race theory,First amendment,Free exercise,Intersectionality,John africa,Law,New religious movements,Nrms,Postcolonial theory,Prison studies,The move organization},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {3--41},
  publisher    = {Equinox Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {International Journal for the Study of New Religions},
  title        = {Removing MOVE : A case study of intersectional invisibility within religious and legal studies},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1558/ijsnr.v7i1.20308},
  volume       = {7},
  year         = {2016},
}