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Early Jurassic microbial mats—A potential response to reduced biotic activity in the aftermath of the end-Triassic mass extinction event

Peterffy, Olof; Calner, Mikael LU and Vajda, Vivi LU (2016) In Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 464. p.76-85
Abstract

Wrinkle structures are microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISS) formed by cyanobacteria and are common in pre-Cambrian and Cambrian siltstones and sandstones but are otherwise rare in the Phanerozoic geological record. This paper reports the first discovery of Mesozoic wrinkle structures from Sweden. These are preserved in fine-grained and organic-rich heterolithic strata of the Lower Jurassic (Hettangian) Höganäs Formation in Skåne, southern Sweden. The strata formed in a low-energy, shallow subtidal setting in the marginal parts of the Danish rift-basin. Palynological analyses of fine-grained sandstones hosting the wrinkle structures show that the local terrestrial environment probably consisted of a wetland hosting ferns,... (More)

Wrinkle structures are microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISS) formed by cyanobacteria and are common in pre-Cambrian and Cambrian siltstones and sandstones but are otherwise rare in the Phanerozoic geological record. This paper reports the first discovery of Mesozoic wrinkle structures from Sweden. These are preserved in fine-grained and organic-rich heterolithic strata of the Lower Jurassic (Hettangian) Höganäs Formation in Skåne, southern Sweden. The strata formed in a low-energy, shallow subtidal setting in the marginal parts of the Danish rift-basin. Palynological analyses of fine-grained sandstones hosting the wrinkle structures show that the local terrestrial environment probably consisted of a wetland hosting ferns, cypress and the extinct conifer family Cheirolepidaceae. Palynostratigraphy indicates a Hettangian age, still within the floral recovery phase following the end-Triassic mass extinction event. The finding of wrinkle structures is significant as the presence of microbial mats in the shallow subtidal zone, (in a deeper setting compared to where modern epibenthic microbial mats grow) suggests decreased benthic biodiversity and suppressed grazing in shallow marine environments in the early aftermath of the end-Triassic mass extinction event.

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organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cyanobacteria, Hettangian, Mass extinction, Microbial mat, Sweden, Wrinkle structures
in
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology
volume
464
pages
10 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:84969909605
  • wos:000389109600007
ISSN
0031-0182
DOI
10.1016/j.palaeo.2015.12.024
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9b9832ba-31f6-4758-b7fb-cc3bbed200e0
date added to LUP
2016-11-25 07:30:15
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:31:14
@article{9b9832ba-31f6-4758-b7fb-cc3bbed200e0,
  abstract     = {<p>Wrinkle structures are microbially induced sedimentary structures (MISS) formed by cyanobacteria and are common in pre-Cambrian and Cambrian siltstones and sandstones but are otherwise rare in the Phanerozoic geological record. This paper reports the first discovery of Mesozoic wrinkle structures from Sweden. These are preserved in fine-grained and organic-rich heterolithic strata of the Lower Jurassic (Hettangian) Höganäs Formation in Skåne, southern Sweden. The strata formed in a low-energy, shallow subtidal setting in the marginal parts of the Danish rift-basin. Palynological analyses of fine-grained sandstones hosting the wrinkle structures show that the local terrestrial environment probably consisted of a wetland hosting ferns, cypress and the extinct conifer family Cheirolepidaceae. Palynostratigraphy indicates a Hettangian age, still within the floral recovery phase following the end-Triassic mass extinction event. The finding of wrinkle structures is significant as the presence of microbial mats in the shallow subtidal zone, (in a deeper setting compared to where modern epibenthic microbial mats grow) suggests decreased benthic biodiversity and suppressed grazing in shallow marine environments in the early aftermath of the end-Triassic mass extinction event.</p>},
  author       = {Peterffy, Olof and Calner, Mikael and Vajda, Vivi},
  issn         = {0031-0182},
  keyword      = {Cyanobacteria,Hettangian,Mass extinction,Microbial mat,Sweden,Wrinkle structures},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  pages        = {76--85},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology},
  title        = {Early Jurassic microbial mats—A potential response to reduced biotic activity in the aftermath of the end-Triassic mass extinction event},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.palaeo.2015.12.024},
  volume       = {464},
  year         = {2016},
}