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Invertebrate Neurohormone GPCRs

Grimmelikhuijzen, C. J P; Cazzamali, G.; Williamson, M.; Schneider, M. LU and Hauser, F. (2010) In Encyclopedia of Neuroscience p.205-212
Abstract

Neurohormones (biogenic amines, neuropeptides, and protein hormones) and their G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) occupy a high hierarchic position in the physiology of invertebrates because they steer important processes such as development, growth, reproduction, feeding, homeostasis, and behavior. In this article, we focus on the neurohormone GPCRs from insects (which comprise 75% of all animal species) and complement them with further examples from other invertebrates. The presence of 24 insect genome projects has greatly facilitated the identification of insect neurohormone GPCRs and has enabled us to draw important conclusions on the evolution and co-evolution of insect neurohormone GPCRs and their ligands.

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author
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adipokinetic hormone, Biogenic amine, Caenorhabditis, Cnidarian, Crustacean, Drosophila, Evolution, FMRFamide, G-protein-coupled receptor, GPCR, Honey bee, Hormone, Hydra, Insect, Invertebrate, Lymnaea, Mollusk, Monoamine, Nervous system, Neurohormone, Neuropeptide, Octopus, Oxytocin, Roundworm, Second messenger, Vasopressin
in
Encyclopedia of Neuroscience
editor
Squire, Larry R. and
pages
8 pages
publisher
IFAC & Elsevier Ltd.
external identifiers
  • scopus:84882872261
ISBN
9780080450469
DOI
10.1016/B978-008045046-9.01445-5
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
9e87bf30-82d6-4791-af25-40f40e15033a
date added to LUP
2017-01-12 11:43:14
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:56:23
@inbook{9e87bf30-82d6-4791-af25-40f40e15033a,
  abstract     = {<p>Neurohormones (biogenic amines, neuropeptides, and protein hormones) and their G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) occupy a high hierarchic position in the physiology of invertebrates because they steer important processes such as development, growth, reproduction, feeding, homeostasis, and behavior. In this article, we focus on the neurohormone GPCRs from insects (which comprise 75% of all animal species) and complement them with further examples from other invertebrates. The presence of 24 insect genome projects has greatly facilitated the identification of insect neurohormone GPCRs and has enabled us to draw important conclusions on the evolution and co-evolution of insect neurohormone GPCRs and their ligands.</p>},
  author       = {Grimmelikhuijzen, C. J P and Cazzamali, G. and Williamson, M. and Schneider, M. and Hauser, F.},
  editor       = {Squire, Larry R.},
  isbn         = {9780080450469},
  keyword      = {Adipokinetic hormone,Biogenic amine,Caenorhabditis,Cnidarian,Crustacean,Drosophila,Evolution,FMRFamide,G-protein-coupled receptor,GPCR,Honey bee,Hormone,Hydra,Insect,Invertebrate,Lymnaea,Mollusk,Monoamine,Nervous system,Neurohormone,Neuropeptide,Octopus,Oxytocin,Roundworm,Second messenger,Vasopressin},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {205--212},
  publisher    = {IFAC & Elsevier Ltd.},
  series       = {Encyclopedia of Neuroscience},
  title        = {Invertebrate Neurohormone GPCRs},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-008045046-9.01445-5},
  year         = {2010},
}