Advanced

Regional innovation systems and global flows of knowledge

Martin, Roman LU ; Aslesen, Heidi Wiig LU ; Grillitsch, Markus LU and Herstad, Sverre J. (2018) p.127-147
Abstract

The literature on regional innovation systems emphasizes the role of the region as locus for interactive learning and knowledge exchange, stressing the importance of (geographical) proximity for innovation. Even though the importance of extra-regional knowledge is widely acknowledged, there has been only little emphasis on the particular role and the nature of global knowledge flows. The aim of this chapter is to explore the differentiated nature of global knowledge flows in regional innovation systems. We provide an overview of the different ways firms can gain access to global knowledge sources. Identified knowledge sourcing channels include international R&D collaborations, foreign direct investments, personally embedded... (More)

The literature on regional innovation systems emphasizes the role of the region as locus for interactive learning and knowledge exchange, stressing the importance of (geographical) proximity for innovation. Even though the importance of extra-regional knowledge is widely acknowledged, there has been only little emphasis on the particular role and the nature of global knowledge flows. The aim of this chapter is to explore the differentiated nature of global knowledge flows in regional innovation systems. We provide an overview of the different ways firms can gain access to global knowledge sources. Identified knowledge sourcing channels include international R&D collaborations, foreign direct investments, personally embedded relationships, international mobility of skilled labour, virtual communities and online platforms, and the participation in temporary clusters such as fairs, exhibitions, and conferences. Depending on regional innovation system preconditions, firms use and combine different knowledge sourcing channels to access global knowledge. Firms in organisationally thick and diversified regional innovation systems have a geographical advantage in accessing knowledge globally, but even firms in peripheral areas can exchange knowledge worldwide, due to improved means of transport and communication at distance. Furthermore, not only multinational companies that are dominated by analytical or synthetic knowledge bases, but even small and medium sized enterprises in symbolic industries are often deeply involved in global knowledge sourcing activities. We illustrate our arguments with interview data collected among New Media firms in southern Sweden and in the Oslo Region in Norway.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Globalisation of innovation, Knowledge sourcing, New media, Regional innovation systems
host publication
New Avenues for Regional Innovation Systems - Theoretical Advances, Empirical Cases and Policy Lessons
pages
21 pages
publisher
Springer International Publishing AG
external identifiers
  • scopus:85026829012
ISBN
9783319716602
9783319716619
DOI
10.1007/978-3-319-71661-9_7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9e95334c-c9fa-456e-8959-300a50a080eb
date added to LUP
2018-05-22 09:02:50
date last changed
2019-06-11 03:47:24
@inbook{9e95334c-c9fa-456e-8959-300a50a080eb,
  abstract     = {<p>The literature on regional innovation systems emphasizes the role of the region as locus for interactive learning and knowledge exchange, stressing the importance of (geographical) proximity for innovation. Even though the importance of extra-regional knowledge is widely acknowledged, there has been only little emphasis on the particular role and the nature of global knowledge flows. The aim of this chapter is to explore the differentiated nature of global knowledge flows in regional innovation systems. We provide an overview of the different ways firms can gain access to global knowledge sources. Identified knowledge sourcing channels include international R&amp;D collaborations, foreign direct investments, personally embedded relationships, international mobility of skilled labour, virtual communities and online platforms, and the participation in temporary clusters such as fairs, exhibitions, and conferences. Depending on regional innovation system preconditions, firms use and combine different knowledge sourcing channels to access global knowledge. Firms in organisationally thick and diversified regional innovation systems have a geographical advantage in accessing knowledge globally, but even firms in peripheral areas can exchange knowledge worldwide, due to improved means of transport and communication at distance. Furthermore, not only multinational companies that are dominated by analytical or synthetic knowledge bases, but even small and medium sized enterprises in symbolic industries are often deeply involved in global knowledge sourcing activities. We illustrate our arguments with interview data collected among New Media firms in southern Sweden and in the Oslo Region in Norway.</p>},
  author       = {Martin, Roman and Aslesen, Heidi Wiig and Grillitsch, Markus and Herstad, Sverre J.},
  isbn         = {9783319716602},
  keyword      = {Globalisation of innovation,Knowledge sourcing,New media,Regional innovation systems},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  pages        = {127--147},
  publisher    = {Springer International Publishing AG},
  title        = {Regional innovation systems and global flows of knowledge},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-71661-9_7},
  year         = {2018},
}