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Proton pump inhibitor medication is associated with colonisation of gut flora in the oropharynx

Tranberg, A LU ; Thorarinsdottir, H R LU ; Holmberg, A LU ; Schött, U LU and Klarin, B LU (2018) In Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 62(6). p.791-800
Abstract

BACKGROUND: The normal body exists in mutualistic balance with a large range of microbiota. The primary goal of this study was to establish whether there is an imbalance in the oropharyngeal flora early after hospital or ICU admittance, and whether flora differs between control, ward and critically ill patients. The secondary goal was to explore whether there are patient characteristics that can be associated with a disturbed oropharyngeal flora.

METHODS: Oropharyngeal cultures were obtained from three different study groups: (1) controls from the community, (2) ward patients and (3) critically ill patients, the two latter within 24 h after admittance.

RESULTS: Cultures were obtained from 487 individuals: 77 controls, 193... (More)

BACKGROUND: The normal body exists in mutualistic balance with a large range of microbiota. The primary goal of this study was to establish whether there is an imbalance in the oropharyngeal flora early after hospital or ICU admittance, and whether flora differs between control, ward and critically ill patients. The secondary goal was to explore whether there are patient characteristics that can be associated with a disturbed oropharyngeal flora.

METHODS: Oropharyngeal cultures were obtained from three different study groups: (1) controls from the community, (2) ward patients and (3) critically ill patients, the two latter within 24 h after admittance.

RESULTS: Cultures were obtained from 487 individuals: 77 controls, 193 ward patients and 217 critically ill patients. Abnormal pharyngeal flora was more frequent in critically ill and ward patients compared with controls (62.2% and 10.4% vs. 1.3%, P < 0.001 and P = 0.010, respectively). Colonisation of gut flora in the oropharynx was more frequent in critically ill patients compared with ward patients or controls (26.3% vs. 4.7% and 1.3%, P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Proton pump inhibitor medication was the strongest independent factor associated with the presence of gut flora in the oropharynx in both ward and critically ill patients (P = 0.030 and P = 0.044, respectively).

CONCLUSION: This study indicates that abnormal oropharyngeal flora is an early and frequent event in hospitalised patients and more so in the critically ill, compared to controls. Proton pump inhibitor medication is associated with colonisation of gut flora in the oropharynx.

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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Journal Article
in
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
volume
62
issue
6
pages
10 pages
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85048310539
  • pmid:29520757
ISSN
0001-5172
DOI
10.1111/aas.13094
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
9ee04ddc-7584-4104-8676-c0164dfc6b94
date added to LUP
2018-03-16 10:39:11
date last changed
2021-04-06 01:38:51
@article{9ee04ddc-7584-4104-8676-c0164dfc6b94,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: The normal body exists in mutualistic balance with a large range of microbiota. The primary goal of this study was to establish whether there is an imbalance in the oropharyngeal flora early after hospital or ICU admittance, and whether flora differs between control, ward and critically ill patients. The secondary goal was to explore whether there are patient characteristics that can be associated with a disturbed oropharyngeal flora.</p><p>METHODS: Oropharyngeal cultures were obtained from three different study groups: (1) controls from the community, (2) ward patients and (3) critically ill patients, the two latter within 24 h after admittance.</p><p>RESULTS: Cultures were obtained from 487 individuals: 77 controls, 193 ward patients and 217 critically ill patients. Abnormal pharyngeal flora was more frequent in critically ill and ward patients compared with controls (62.2% and 10.4% vs. 1.3%, P &lt; 0.001 and P = 0.010, respectively). Colonisation of gut flora in the oropharynx was more frequent in critically ill patients compared with ward patients or controls (26.3% vs. 4.7% and 1.3%, P &lt; 0.001 and P &lt; 0.001, respectively). Proton pump inhibitor medication was the strongest independent factor associated with the presence of gut flora in the oropharynx in both ward and critically ill patients (P = 0.030 and P = 0.044, respectively).</p><p>CONCLUSION: This study indicates that abnormal oropharyngeal flora is an early and frequent event in hospitalised patients and more so in the critically ill, compared to controls. Proton pump inhibitor medication is associated with colonisation of gut flora in the oropharynx.</p>},
  author       = {Tranberg, A and Thorarinsdottir, H R and Holmberg, A and Schött, U and Klarin, B},
  issn         = {0001-5172},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {791--800},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Proton pump inhibitor medication is associated with colonisation of gut flora in the oropharynx},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aas.13094},
  doi          = {10.1111/aas.13094},
  volume       = {62},
  year         = {2018},
}