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Perceptions of experiences of having a sibling stem cell donor

Kisch, Annika LU and Forsberg, Anna LU (2018) In Clinical Nursing Studies 6(4). p.59-68
Abstract
Objective: The aim was to explore stem cell recipients’ perceptions of experiences of having a sibling donor from pretransplantation to one year afterwards in order to support their learning process.
Methods: Ten adult recipients, five women and four men, with a mean age of 52 years (19-68 years) receiving stem cells from a sibling donor were included consecutively. We used a phenomenographic approach to analyse the 28 open-ended interviews that took place before transplantation and three months and one year afterwards.
Results: Ten categories emerged comprising 110 different perceptions pertaining to: Advantages, Acknowledgement, Risk evaluation, Complexity, Family impact, Non-directed donors, Self-identity, Facing the reality,... (More)
Objective: The aim was to explore stem cell recipients’ perceptions of experiences of having a sibling donor from pretransplantation to one year afterwards in order to support their learning process.
Methods: Ten adult recipients, five women and four men, with a mean age of 52 years (19-68 years) receiving stem cells from a sibling donor were included consecutively. We used a phenomenographic approach to analyse the 28 open-ended interviews that took place before transplantation and three months and one year afterwards.
Results: Ten categories emerged comprising 110 different perceptions pertaining to: Advantages, Acknowledgement, Risk evaluation, Complexity, Family impact, Non-directed donors, Self-identity, Facing the reality, Knowledge seeking and Caring encounters. Three distinct phases of the learning process were identified from before transplantation to one year afterwards, i.e., risk-benefit analysis, outcome expectations and facing the reality.
Conclusions: Before transplantation the recipients had many perceptions about having a sibling donor and focused on a thorough risk versus benefit analysis for both themselves and the donor. Three months after transplantation the recipients sought knowledge in order to have realistic expectations and comprehend their future. One year after transplantation the recipients had few perceptions and focused on facing the reality, irrespective of whether the outcome was good or bad. The generic perceptions of the recipients over time were that serious blood diseases are burdensome and lethal, while treatment should include continuity of care. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
Clinical Nursing Studies
volume
6
issue
4
pages
59 - 68
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a0e5a5d7-6f42-423d-abcb-87d645603747
alternative location
http://www.sciedupress.com/journal/index.php/cns/article/view/13392/8390
date added to LUP
2019-05-30 22:47:41
date last changed
2019-06-04 12:51:43
@article{a0e5a5d7-6f42-423d-abcb-87d645603747,
  abstract     = {Objective: The aim was to explore stem cell recipients’ perceptions of experiences of having a sibling donor from pretransplantation to one year afterwards in order to support their learning process.<br/>Methods: Ten adult recipients, five women and four men, with a mean age of 52 years (19-68 years) receiving stem cells from a sibling donor were included consecutively. We used a phenomenographic approach to analyse the 28 open-ended interviews that took place before transplantation and three months and one year afterwards.<br/>Results: Ten categories emerged comprising 110 different perceptions pertaining to: Advantages, Acknowledgement, Risk evaluation, Complexity, Family impact, Non-directed donors, Self-identity, Facing the reality, Knowledge seeking and Caring encounters. Three distinct phases of the learning process were identified from before transplantation to one year afterwards, i.e., risk-benefit analysis, outcome expectations and facing the reality.<br/>Conclusions: Before transplantation the recipients had many perceptions about having a sibling donor and focused on a thorough risk versus benefit analysis for both themselves and the donor. Three months after transplantation the recipients sought knowledge in order to have realistic expectations and comprehend their future. One year after transplantation the recipients had few perceptions and focused on facing the reality, irrespective of whether the outcome was good or bad. The generic perceptions of the recipients over time were that serious blood diseases are burdensome and lethal, while treatment should include continuity of care.},
  author       = {Kisch, Annika and Forsberg, Anna},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {59--68},
  series       = {Clinical Nursing Studies},
  title        = {Perceptions of experiences of having a sibling stem cell donor},
  url          = {http://www.sciedupress.com/journal/index.php/cns/article/view/13392/8390},
  volume       = {6},
  year         = {2018},
}